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10 thoughts on “NIST Puts Smart Phone Translation Technology to the Test

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  2. From Craig Schlenoff, Project Leader, NIST TRANSTAC Evaluation Team

    For this effort, we have focused on one dialect of Pashto, namely Kandahari. However, when the same systems were put in front of people who speak other dialects, they still worked, though not as well. The systems are only as good as what they are trained on … if you train them on other dialects, they should work equally well on them.

  3. From Craig Schlenoff, Project Leader, NIST TRANSTAC Evaluation Team

    The systems tend to work better on shorter, simpler sentences, but can still be used for more complex sentences. From initial analysis, utterances that are less than 15 words seem to work best with roughly linear degradation after that as a function of the number of words.

  4. From Craig Schlenoff, Project Leader, NIST TRANSTAC Evaluation Team
    The time the systems takes to translate a sentence does vary with the length of the sentence. A few words sentence may only take a second or two while a longer sentences (10 words) may take 4-5 seconds.

  5. @dagreatone2009 I heard that Talibans put a higher price on capturing interpretors than US soldiers. Are you training for this dialect?

  6. You might want to check out a Canadian company called Intertainment Media, they own a technology called "Ortsbo", from what I am reading about it, it surpasses Google translate or any other translation software available today, they have also teamed up with lexifone, to provide voice to voice and voice to text translation with 95% accuracy.

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