Magpul Daka Pouch Review | Organize Your Travel Gear, Camera Gear, Cords, and Tech Accessories


In this video we’re going to be taking a
look at the Magpul DAKA pouches. I’m Tom, the founder of Pack Hacker. We do travel
tips and tricks videos, and do gear reviews like this all the time. So if
you’re new to the Pack Hacker channel, consider subscribing. So let’s jump right
into these Magpul DAKA pouches – great for organizing your gear when you’re on the
road, and provide some really good weather resistance as well. Let’s jump
right in. [upbeat music playing] So when you first go onto the Magpul website and you take a look at
all the DAKA items, there are a ton to choose from. But we are going to be
focusing on the small pouch and the medium one as well. We found that these
are good sizes for travel. They also have like a couple wallets and a couple other
things, but for this we’re just going to focus on the pouches. At the time of this
review there are six colors spread across the different lines of the DAKA
pouches. When you first take a look at these things they are no-nonsense, no BS
pouch and there’s a ton of slick utility that goes into these. The reinforced
polymer fabric provides a grippy feel, and the welded look on the sides
provides a clean polished look and a very strong bond on these pouches. Quick
note on the material – it’s super nice; however if you have your pack or your
luggage and it’s kind of jammed really full, it will be harder to pull out the
individual pouches than say some other packing cubes or some other containers
that are made of ripstop nylon or material that’s more slippery. All this
is wrapped up with a YKK AquaGuard zipper and a 550 Paracord heat shrunk
wrapped zipper pole, which is great to access even if you have gloves on.
We have heard some reports that this heat shrink can kind of slip around a
little bit after a while, but we haven’t experienced it ourselves in a collective
usage timeframe of five months between three contributors. The carabiner attachment points feel
solid and we’ve had a lot of luck using the S-BINER from Nite Ize. We find that they’re a little bit easier to use than traditional carabiners. They’re strong
and then they’re also still lightweight. We would be curious to see these
carabiner clips in the lower left and lower right hand corners instead of the
upper corners, just because we feel like it would save some space potentially.
We’re curious as to why they made this design decision because the zipper is
actually, you know, not as long in length so the opening isn’t quite as big. So
there’s actually less room where the opening is and there’s more room on the
bottom. So you kind of lose maybe about half an inch from these carabiner
attachment points that could have been used to open the DAKA pouch up a little
bit further. So we’re curious as to their design decision around this. Maybe it’s
for some reason, but we have found that it doesn’t quite open up as wide as we’d
like it in comparison to how much actual space is inside the pouch. Also there’s a
clever dot grid matrix on this thing which lets you kind of label each of
these pouches based on what you’re going to be organizing in there. Of course we just
wrote Pack Hacker on ours because “Hey, branding!” and you can write whatever
you’d like. Now there’s a couple different ways to organize the DAKA
pouches. Since they do offer so many colors you could kind of create a mental
model based on colors. Maybe oranges for camera gear and electronics, whereas
black is for toiletries or whatever works well in your head. Another option
is to use this dot grid matrix that they do offer and it’s really, really slick. We
found that using a fine-tipped, oil-based Sharpie works really well. We
found that you can kind of get in there and those nooks and crannies and kind of
fill it out. We did have a little bit more trouble using a Sharpie with a
fatter marker head. Again this is optional – totally helps you organize your
gear if you want to do it, however it’s easy enough to just not even worry about
it; just leave plain. Although Magpul doesn’t claim these are waterproof
they’re pretty damn close. And we ran ours under a faucet to do a bit of a
rain test – no water whatsoever. We also submerged it in a foot of water for 30
seconds – still great, no water. But then we tried to test it a different way. We filled
up water inside of the pouch and then we applied some
pressure, and you can see that the water kind of sprays out of the YKK AquaGuard
zipper. And basically what that tells us is that it’s going to be fine in a foot of
water; but the deeper you go the more water pressure will start to build up on
that zipper seam, the more likely water will be to get inside of the pouch. So
just avoid water if you can, but if you do kind of drop it in a lake or a stream
you’re probably going to be fine. One other thing to note – make sure that AquaGuard zipper is zipped all the way up, otherwise your water resistance and your
waterproofness is basically going to be non-existent. So it relies on it being
tightly zipped against the edge. Three of our contributors, including myself, have been testing the Magpul DAKA pouches for a collective total of five months. These
heavy-duty pouches are built for the outdoors and made to hold heavy and even sharp objects. So the durability is definitely there for general travel. It’s
more than enough to hold your toiletries and your electronics when you’re on the
road, and they’re also lightweight as a bonus. With the high-quality materials
and the attention to detail in the design, we’re confident that these will
continue to hold up and meet our needs as we continue to use them for longer. So
to wrap up – some of the pros are that these are ultra durable and the
construction is really great. The varying sizes allow you to fit a multitude of
items inside. You know, from toiletries to electronics to camera gear to whatever
it is that you need to organize. These are nearly waterproof, so you won’t
really have to worry about them in the rain or any inclement weather. For some
of the cons – the grippy material of this makes it a little bit harder to pull out
of a tightly packed bag. The length of the zipper is more narrow on the top
than it is compared to the rest of the pack, so it’s a little bit tighter to fit
things in depending on what you’re trying to put inside. It’s not ideal
for protecting delicate items, and you don’t get that additional organization
that you’ll get in some other toiletry bags or dopp kits. Alright thanks for
taking a look at the Magpul DAKA pouches. We hope this review is helpful
to you. Be sure to head over to packhacker.com/newsletter; sign up for
that newsletter and never miss an update. So thanks for
checking this out, we’ll see you in the next video. well. did. look. doo to too Hmm that’s weird. I’m going to cut you.. Goodbye!

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17 thoughts on “Magpul Daka Pouch Review | Organize Your Travel Gear, Camera Gear, Cords, and Tech Accessories

  1. What other alternatives are there? These look good, but I am curious what other options there might be.

  2. One question, does anybody know what the actual material is? They only say it’s polymer fabric but nothing can be found online, maybe it’s under another name. I would like to purchase some of this fabric or similar for some projects, but cant really find it.

  3. My guess as to why the carbiner holes are not on the bottom of the pouch: because if they were maybe when you open the pouch while it's hanging, everything will fall out?

  4. I think the zipper does not go from end to end is to have a tighter seal between the ends of zipper and the start of the polymer material

  5. i agree with the carabiner hole placement, i fit my pistol and spare mag and its very difficult to put it in there but it fits perfectly. Definitely sort of an issue but other than that they are freakin awesome!

  6. main reason I don't like these pouches is exactly what you said about the zipper placement, poor design.

  7. The carabiner attachment point is not just to link Dakas together. With two rings/S-biners and a strap you can turn any Daka pouch into an ultra-minimalist waterproof sling.

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