LA Video Hackathon Demo Nite


JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Please– please make your
way over here. Come on guys. You don’t want to miss out. [INAUDIBLE]. Come up. Come up here. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Are
you guys ready? AUDIENCE: Oh yeah. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All right. We’re going to start
here in a second. We have a live audience
tonight. So say hello to the people
on the internet. AUDIENCE: [CHEERS] JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
Hello, people. Thank you very much
for coming. We’re going to roll a short
pre-roll for folks on the internet and officially kick
off this broadcast. Operator, roll it. MALE SPEAKER: It will be just
a thee-minute delay. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: So there
is pre-roll rolling. Are you guys tired,
participants? AUDIENCE: No. JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
Everybody has a beverage of their choice? The bar is still open. AUDIENCE: Yep. MALE SPEAKER: You’re up. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All right. Well, good evening, everyone. Welcome to YouTube Developers
Live from Los Angeles today. We have an exciting show
for you today. We are reporting live from
Google Offices in beautiful Venice, California. And let me tell you a little
bit about this event. We started Saturday morning
with about 60 people. Throughout the event, the number
of guests fluctuated. But we are here in full force. We have impressive judges
tonight who will be judging the entries for our Hackathon. Let me introduce the judges. We have Nanea Reeves
from Machinima. How are you doing? NANEA REEVES: Good, thank you. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Thank you
very much for coming. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Then George
Strompolos from Fullscreen. How you doing, George? GEORGE STROMPOLOS:
Doing very well. It’s good to be here. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: And Paul
Carff from Google. How are you doing, Paul? PAUL CARFF: Good, thanks. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All
right, thank you. And then I have Krispy
with me here. KRISPY: Woo! [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Krispy’s going
to help the contestants get their demos working. He’s an extremely fast
developer, so he fan fix last-minute bugs in your
code before you even know they existed. Right? KRISPY: Yeah, it costs a
lot per line, though. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All right. So before we start, we were
going to play a short video for you to kind of summarize
what has happened over the last 48 hours, and also give
people watching us live a preview of how the work that
these awesome teams have put together came about. So let us try to
roll the video. Krispy edited this. KRISPY: Where is [INAUDIBLE]? JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Right
on that spot. KRISPY: All right, so
this I just sort of hacked together myself. Many of you remember
me walking around with a camera today. So this is the short version. We have a longer one
coming later. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] -We’re here to help you, answer
your questions, so that this becomes a fairly enjoyable
event and you guys can walk away feeling that
you’ve accomplished something. -This is my desk. -People ask me whether
this is a real photo. And the answer is, it
is a real photo of me with a fake sign. [LAUGHTER] -It’s 166,000 years
of television watched in a single day. -We don’t want any conflict
between us and Google and their advertisement, because
our app has to do with enhancing the user interface
while you’re watching content through your Google TV. -You ready for another exciting
day of hacking? -Yes. -Good. -As ready as ever. -It’s a cool hackathon combining
YouTube and Google TV technologies. It welcomed everyone,
talked a little bit. And folks are putting up all
their ideas, and teams are trying to form. And we’re looking forward to one
hell of an event tonight. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] KRISPY: Oh, we don’t have a
projector, so lucky us. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Occasionally
our projectors decide that it’s time to power down. So this was one of
those times. KRISPY: KS Monkey
strikes again. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: We’ll
bring them back up. KRISPY: I don’t even
have a mic. JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
The mic is out. MALE SPEAKER: Oh,
the mic is out. KRISPY: So this will
take two minutes. The internet thinks something
crazy is going on right now, OK? They’re freaking out. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: So they
typically shut down at the least-opportune moment. And what is this all called? AUDIENCE: Murphy’s Law. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Murphy’s
Law, all right. We have some developers
who know. AUDIENCE: In front
of your screen. KRISPY: Yes. It says, “please wait while
the projector powers down. This will take approximately
two minutes.” And I have no other options. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: This is
a very simple system. KRISPY: So we know that the
demo gods are in the house tonight, because if this
is happening to me, I pity all of you. All right, we’ll get
this sorted out. I guess while we’re waiting,
who wants to call out their favorite moment of
this weekend? AUDIENCE: In-N-Out. KRISPY: In-N-Out Burger? You guys like the food? AUDIENCE: Yeah. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Who at the
most burgers? AUDIENCE: Four. KRISPY: Four burgers? [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Hungry man. I best you had pizza afterwards,
too, right? OK, so I guess we got
a little dead time. I don’t really know
what to do. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Yeah, so for
those of you that have just joined us, I wanted to give you
a brief introduction of what it is that Nexus
7 actually uses. So in this course of this
hackathon, we have been using various Google technologies. YouTube has recently released
several new APIs. So YouTube Data API V3, Player
API, Analytics API. And the content stands have
actually been using them for these beautiful applications
that hopefully will all work shortly. In addition to that, we were
using Google TV boxes, sponsored by the
Google TV team. Paul works on that team. Thank you very much, Paul. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Your credit
card is due shortly. So we have quite a few Google
TV demos as well. I wanted to make one note. Krispy actually edited
this video. And it made me realize that
he has extremely good video-editing skills, because
I could never do something like this, Krispy. KRISPY: It’s a hobby of mine. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: And that makes
me a little worried, because I know our judges
represent companies that I actually have done business,
and they are hiring. [LAUGHTER] AUDIENCE: I have a recruiter
here, Kim. Kim, where are you? She’s got a Machinima
t-shirt on. So if you’re interested,
we have [INAUDIBLE]. [MUSIC PLAYING] KRISPY: All right, we’ve
almost got this sorted. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Yeah,
we got the audio back. Video’s coming back. Shortly. Already up. Yes, and YouTube
is also hiring. We are right here
in Santa Monica. To find out more, go to
developers.google.com/jobs for develop relations jobs, and
google.com/jobs for Google opportunities. We also have catalogs
out here that can help you with questions. So let us now talk about the
logistics for tonight. As I mentioned, we have a lot
of different interesting applications built with several
YouTube and Google TV technologies. Each team will have five
minutes– three minutes for demo and pitch. You’ll be pitching to
our awesome judges. And do your best. Then the others will have about
two minutes for Q&A, after which we transfer
to the next team. We have about 14 teams. We had 15. One team had to bail out
at the last minute. Their UI developer wasn’t able
to make it, but they made excellent progress
on the back end. And they have also
[INAUDIBLE]. So I just wanted a round of
applause to the team that almost made it. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: And
let’s get started. So we’re going to go in
the order that we have shared with you. KRISPY: Team number one. JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
Please come up. KRISPY: The YouTube
Social mashup. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: And do we have an
official clock-timer? Or shall I do that? All right. MALE SPEAKER: So how many
mics are there? KRISPY: There is one. Well, if somebody wants to stand
at the podium, you can use that mic, too. MALE SPEAKER: That’s cool. MALE SPEAKER: Hello, everyone. We’ve had a great
weekend so far. We’re YouTube Social. MALE SPEAKER: I’m not
disconnecting anything. MALE SPEAKER: And we’ve been
hacking away for a bunch of hours now. And some of us slept,
some didn’t. YouTube Social is all about
current trending topics and content that’s posted
on YouTube. MALE SPEAKER: So YouTube Social
allows you to check out the latest trending videos being
posted on Google+ and Twitter right now. You can watch it right
from your television. Just click Play and
start watching. Otherwise, we also have a
search API, or a search feature, that’s currently
being looked for. And you can search for your
latest interests, any subject you want to search on, and it’ll
return those results that are being posted right
now on Twitter, Google+. You can search for your favorite
artists or superstar, and you’ll get what people are
compelled to post about that right now, all the
videos live. You can even continue to come
back and get the latest results every time
you come back. We’re good? We’re gonna show off
some searching. MALE SPEAKER: OK, showing it? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. So again, you play, switch out
the videos, you’ll get that information of who tweeted
or Google+ information. [MUSIC PLAYING] MALE SPEAKER: Sweet. Someone else. And before we find something we
don’t want to, let’s check out the search feature. Strongbob. Spongebob, there we go. What’s this guy selling? [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -What’s with all that yelling? You just can’t wait for
me to die, can you? -They’re selling chocolate. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: I think we’re
good with that. Keep searching. MALE SPEAKER: How about
them Lakers? AUDIENCE: Yeah. MALE SPEAKER: What
you got, Lakers? [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -How about [INAUDIBLE] tonight. [INAUDIBLE] from LeBron James. What did he do to get a hug like
that from LeBron just a moment ago? [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -[INAUDIBLE]. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: So not only can
you sit at home and follow your favorite artists or team or
whatever celebrity that you like and see videos that people
are talking about at real-time, it’s completely
multi-screen experience. And on your cell phone, on the
go, or wherever you are, you can have it– pull it up. Oh, sorry. KRISPY: You guys have
30 seconds. MALE SPEAKER: OK. I wanted to show this,
but I can’t. Skip it, please, because
probably going to go slow. MALE SPEAKER: We’re trying a
new platform, it’s pretty almost responsive. MALE SPEAKER: OK, so
there’s the thing. MALE SPEAKER: It’s
a hosted app. MALE SPEAKER: It’s a hosted
app, anywhere on your TV– KRISPY: 10. MALE SPEAKER: –one your
computer, on your cell phone, everywhere accessible. Thank you so much. And with that, we open
to questions. MALE SPEAKER: All right. KRISPY: All right. [APPLAUSE] MALE SPEAKER: We welcome
technical questions. We might duck and leave,
but we welcome them. KRISPY: Team number three, if
you could make your way up at the same time. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: And any
questions from the judges? MALE SPEAKER: Questions,
please, please. Get techy, get hardcore. PAUL CARFF: Hey guys,
congratulations on getting to this point. I had a question. As a user, are the videos that
you’re returning tied to my personal social feeds in any
way, or is it sort of generalized? MALE SPEAKER: Not currently. But we can follow a certain
deal, so for example, certain handles or certain hashtags. But yeah, currently we’re not. Adding that would be
just identification and adding your personal– MALE SPEAKER: And you have to
sign in through OAuth, either through your Google+ account
or via Twitter account. And then we’d be able to have
the access to actually show you the YouTube content with
people that you know and that are close to you are
actually posting. And you do it out of the luxury
of your living room, because many of you don’t want
to watch that kind of stuff at work, perhaps it’s not
professional, you don’t want to mix personal with work
and that stuff. So you might want to come home
and watch the content your crowd put online. NANEA REEVES: Could you explain
how you would make it relevant to me? MALE SPEAKER: I mean, in the
first place, because you’re interested in something
you do a search for. So if you’re interested
in football– NANEA REEVES: So it’s all
keyed off the searching. Would you do any trending
as well? MALE SPEAKER: It gets the latest
tweets and Google+s right now, like literally the
latest ones right now. And you can get the
search ones. If you don’t do any search, then
you just get whatever’s the latest. NANEA REEVES: So there’s
no delay? MALE SPEAKER: There’s
no delay. It’s whatever people are doing
right now and are compelled to post on Twitter. NANEA REEVES: So it’d actually
be faster than YouTube commenting is right now. MALE SPEAKER: Exactly. MALE SPEAKER: It’s actually
[INAUDIBLE]. People might be uploading, and
you see the result before the upload finishes. KRISPY: OK, I’m gonna have
to cut you guys off here. And, team number three,
where are you? We need to get going. Oh, you’re right here? Great. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: And just a reminder to
all the teams presenting tonight, please talk into the
microphone so the intertubes can hear you. So do you want me to cue
the URL for you? Or who’s gonna be here? CHARLIE STIGLER: Yeah,
you can start it up. There’s only one person, so
I’ll be here for a second, then I’ll be over there
in a little bit. Hi. I’m Charlie Stigler. I’m the founder of Zaption. Zaption is a platform
on the web. Pretty much, we let people
collaborate and learn from interactive experiences. So for example, a teacher who
wants to easily share a learning experience with their
students can put together a series of videos and different
kinds of questions and annotations and share it
with their students. And it kind of democratizes
learning, because they’re able to do all of this themselves
without the help of large new platforms. So the problem with that is
that there’s not a lot of money in education, so it’s
expensive for them to upload their videos to our servers. And since they had very
low budgets, it was impractical for them. So what I worked on this weekend
is using YouTube as our videos host. So it’s a seamless upload
experience with YouTube, and they can actually do everything
without their even realizing almost that they’re
using YouTube. So I’m going to go show
how it works. Unfortunately, I have
to type while I’m– KRISPY: You can [INAUDIBLE]. CHARLIE STIGLER: Oh, great. Thanks. So this is what how I can create
one of these video experiences. So let’s say we want to create
the experience in biology. So we can just go over here
and pull in some clips. So we can pull in clips
from YouTube. For example, We could say,
search YouTube for biology, and pull in some interesting
videos, just drag and drop them into our [? tour ?]
from YouTube. We also upload directly
from YouTube. So we could just click Upload
and store videos from our computer, for example– well, I’d have to
log in, but– onto YouTube. And then once we have our
videos, we want to add some interactions. We could go over here and drag
a text slide in and just edit that in place– say, OK,
watch this video. And then maybe we’d want to,
say, ask them a question. So we can drag in a multiple
choice question and say, what kind of biology is this,
this kind or that kind? So we just easily put in all
these interactive elements. And then we can publish it, and
all of this shows up as they’re going. And it asks them the questions
as they pop up. And of course we also offer
analytics for the [? tour ?] owner, for the person who’s
creating the experiences, to see what did their
viewers respond. Did their students respond
well to these questions? KRISPY: Your time is up. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Well done. Got any questions
from the judges? NANEA REEVES: Yes. So this was an existing product
that you integrated YouTube in, essentially
as a CDM. CHARLIE STIGLER: Yeah, so that’s
the interesting part. Again, it existed. But the new part is that YouTube
now is pretty much our entire back-end. We use almost no YouTube
interface elements– in fact, absolutely zero. But all the back-end hosting,
and we use the player API, the data API, the browser-based
upload API, and the uploader widget. NANEA REEVES: So would you
monetize through YouTube then? CHARLIE STIGLER: We could
monetize through YouTube. More likely we’d sell the
product, probably going to sell it to, like, a school
board or an enterprise organization that wants
to use it, rather than monetizing via ads. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: It
looks really nice. Congratulations. CHARLIE STIGLER: Thanks. GEORGE STROMPOLOS:
I had a question. Are you using the in-out time
codes of YouTube videos? I notice a lot of times, when
people put YouTube videos in sequence, you kind of
only want to show a snippet of it, not– CHARLIE STIGLER: Actually,
yeah, we don’t use– the problem, we can’t YouTube’s
feature, because the way that we loaded videos
dynamically, YouTube doesn’t support that yet. That’s probably how
we’re gonna do it. Currently we fake it. Oh yeah, we do that
exact same thing. We just can’t use the YouTube
feature for it right now, because the API doesn’t
work for that. PAUL CARFF: What was the most
challenging part of integrating this in
this weekend? CHARLIE STIGLER: Actually, there
was a really difficult part with trying to get the
video upload to work without the page refreshing, because
it turns out that’s almost completely not supported, to
post a video using YouTube’s browser-based uploads and
have it not reload. But I found a way by hiding a
hidden iFrame inside the page and all this crazy stuff, so
that everything just keeps going page– in fact, if you
just wait, the videos will process, and you can drive them
straight in the media after uploading them. NANEA REEVES: Are you using
the data API at all? CHARLIE STIGLER: Yeah, we used
the data API to search for videos, pull in information,
and tell when videos are encoded or processed. Yeah, I think we used every
YouTube API, actually. KRISPY: All right, that’s
your two minutes. Can I have the next team up? CHARLIE STIGLER: Thank you. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Thank you very much. JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
And next team. KRISPY: Team number
four, Video Wars. All right, your time
starts now. MALE SPEAKER: Hello,
Venice Beach. How are you? [APPLAUSE] MALE SPEAKER: What’s
your team name? MALE SPEAKER: Oh, we’re
good to go. MALE SPEAKER: What
did we land on? BattleTube? MALE SPEAKER: BattleTube. I’m supposed to throw out there,
our team is from all over the country, came together here at his hackathon. And it’s pretty cool. Thank you, guys, for putting
this on for us. Somebody told me that people
were uploading 72 hours of video per minute to YouTube. We looked into that. We found that about 38 minutes
of that was cat videos. And we just started asking
ourselves, what can we do with the rest of that that’s
interesting? More seriously, though, a lot
of people come online, they watch a lot of videos one after
the other of things that they’re interested in. Those are cat videos, car
videos, music videos, other people playing video
games, you name it. And they find these by
the normal ways. They look at what’s most
shared, most viewed. And that’s cool. You find good stuff. But those lists are
just reinforcing. And we wanted to find maybe a
different, better way to rank these things. So say you like cat videos. You come to our site, you
watch cat videos. You know what, we’re going
to give you two of them on one page. We’re gonna save you a click. And all we want to know is which
one you think is better between these two. So someone comes to our site,
they watch, they vote. We’re gonna store that. We’re gonna analyze
this data and make our own leader boards. We have some categories
we populated. Of course you can
add your own. And I don’t know, we think
this is fun cool. Oh, he’s adding one now. That’s great. What do we got here? Someone throw something out. AUDIENCE: Penguins. MALE SPEAKER: Penguin’s great. Thank you. We’ll just let the app
speak for a minute. Oh, that looks like
a great one. I like it already. All right, that’s my
vote right there. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: All right, cool. So this is fun. People can spend some
time on this. But we also think it has
a pretty cool business application, which we’ll tell
you about in a minute. But first, let’s just talk
a little bit more about what the app does. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, so
we’re integrated with mostly the data API. You can add videos, both by
putting in YouTube channel, you can enter a playlist, or
you can just enter a search term and it’ll automatically
grab the videos related to that. And then if you actually go
into the analytics for a video, we’re using the charts
API, showing the actual battles that have happened,
and how well a video is rating. So those are the APIs
we’re using. And there’s this application. FEMALE SPEAKER: So for example,
say I’m searching for the next country singer, the
next-best country singer. And so I have a bunch of
people upload their own talents on YouTube. But I want to know who is the
best, not the one with the most Twitter followers,
not the one with the most Facebook– KRISPY: OK, your time is up. MALE SPEAKER: That sucks. [LAUGHTER] KRISPY: I had to stop
you somehow. All right, so– MALE SPEAKER: That’s a
good way to do it. KRISPY: –we’ve got questions
from the judges for the next two minutes. PAUL CARFF: So a really
cool, fun concept. It would be fun to use. It would be fun to
see the results. Where do you see it going? How could something
like this evolve? And maybe to sort of tip you
off on that, if you’ve seen Hunch, which is a really cool
application which makes you make simple A-B decisions,
they’ve been able to extract a lot of interesting data
and interest graphs. So where do you see this
potentially going? FEMALE SPEAKER: So as I was
going to say, it’d be good to be used for, say, market
research, because, for example, these two videos
are randomized. So you can’t just pick and
choose, oh, I know that my friend is in this one, so
without looking at any of the other options, I’m gonna
choose this one. So it forces you to choose
between two. And then because of the
algorithm, all of them appear the same amount of time. So in the end, you come
up with a very, very wholesome data set. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, I think
auditions, talent agencies, and research are– that’s how we would
love to see this maybe make some money. But also the consumer
side, just for fun. We want to help people
waste time. NANEA REEVES: I believe that
this moment is the provider on YouTube that does the
video battles. Is that accurate? GEORGE STROMPOLOS: It is. NANEA REEVES: Yeah. OK, I certainly would be
interested in accessing the leader boards from a recruiting standpoint for new channels. And as you said, looking
for new talent. So I think there’s a
good idea there. And I also liked your
presentation a lot. FEMALE SPEAKER: Thank
you so much. NANEA REEVES: Mm-hm. Nice to see a lady
up there, too. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All right,
thank you very much. Thanks. Team number five. KRISPY: Team number five
to the podium. Team number five. MALE SPEAKER: Hey, guys,
how’s it going? We’re [INAUDIBLE] hackers. My name’s [INAUDIBLE]. JACOB: I’m Jacob. MALE SPEAKER: And this
is the app that we decided to build today. So this is Wally. Pretty much it’s a YouTube video
wall, as you can see. Jacob, why don’t you go ahead
and search for, like, Japan earthquake. So pretty much we looked at
YouTube and we thought, how could we make this better? And we thought that the search,
it was cool, but we thought we can make
this cooler. When you look at Google Images
search or something like that, you see all the images
side by side. You can compare them
really easily. So we thought we would do the
same thing for videos. And we’re pretty proud of our
result, with what we came up with in a little bit
more than 24 hours. So you can click on any
video to play it. Click again to pause it. You can play videos
multiple times. So let’s say the Japan
earthquake just happened, and you want to compare the
videos side by side. You don’t have time to go onto
YouTube and click and go back on the browser screen. Who has time for that anymore? So basically you can
just easily compare videos side by side. JACOB: So one of the interesting
things that we found you can do with
it is for music. So having a bunch of videos from
a certain search term up on the wall at the same time
means that you can search between them pretty quickly. So if you type in an artist
that you, like, say, Kanye West or Simon & Garfunkel, you
can actually do both of them at the same time. You’ll get a wall which can
function as a playlist. And you can do different– it’s also really nice having
multiple search terms, because that way you can sort of
increase the bandwidth of things you’re looking
for at once. And another thing that’s nice
about it is video-searching. A lot of the times when there’s
a new event that comes up, you want to know
a lot about it. And usually one video doesn’t
have all of the information you’re looking for. So you can see a bunch of videos
and search between them if one doesn’t look like it has
what you’re looking for. Just give it a few seconds. Sorry. And it also supports up to,
actually, three terms at once. So you can see it interweaves
the different results from– oh. Oh yeah, Kanye West and Simon–
oh, that’s just Simon & Garfunkel. So you can play it,
and it’s nice. MALE SPEAKER: Do we have
any suggestions for stuff to try to search? KRISPY: OK, that’s time. MALE SPEAKER: Oh, that’s time. OK. JACOB: Cool, thank you. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: I think
it’s kind of fun. I had a party at my house a
little while back, and we got YouTube going. And we had to do one
YouTube at a time. And now I don’t have to
do one at a time. I don’t know what’s gonna happen
when I have too many beers going on. So the question I have is, which
API did you find the easiest to use on this? MALE SPEAKER: We used the
Data API for search. And we used the Player API
for embedding videos. And if you want to talk
about the Player API. JACOB: Yeah, the Player API,
at first we had some issues with the iFrame API, because
it would actually steal on mouseover events. And so we had to add buffers
on the side so that it wouldn’t steal the– mouses on the left of the screen
starts going to the left thing. And after that, it actually
started working pretty well. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, the Data
API we thought was really straightforward. It was really easy to just get
a search and compile the results back. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Why the
decision to do horizontal scroll, as opposed to
vertical scroll? MALE SPEAKER: Horizontal
scroll, I feel like it’s more intuitive. We did have the idea to try to
include vertical scroll, but unfortunately we didn’t have
enough time for that. So that could be a future idea
that we could implement. NANEA REEVES: I like
the horizontal UI. I thought it was really good
for TV formats as well. It’d be interesting to see if
you had a play-through feature also that would lend itself to
large screens, where one video would just play in sequence
if I selected one. I was wondering, would you be
able to add a layer where we could, on a mouseover,
look at the info associated with the video? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. We haven’t implemented it yet,
but I think that would be doable with the YouTube API. We were thinking of doing a
mouseover, where you could see the description. NANEA REEVES: Right, I think
that would be cool. And then also, there’s a site
called [? Polywar ?], where they have all these filters
that you can drill down. And I think YouTube search also
has it on the images. It’d be interesting to see what
the video version of that is so I could start filtering
creatively. And I think that would allow
for a lot of expression. I liked it. I thought it was really
cool for the amount of time you had. MALE SPEAKER: Thanks.. KRISPY: All right, that’s
two minutes. Thanks. Next team, please. [INAUDIBLE]. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Team six,
team six, ready for you. All right. MALE SPEAKER: Which page do you
want to– oh, can you get the [INAUDIBLE]? We’re good. MICHAEL: Hi, I’m Michael. We’re part of team Castem. We built a YouTube talent app. So imagine you’re a casting
director and you need to find talent for Survivor,
for example. Casting directors will look
at thousands, if not up to 10,000, potential talents
to cast for the show. In fact, it’s such a big burden
for them that the budget is up to half a million
dollars to cast for the show. Now, imagine your talent, you
have to drive around town, go to a casting call, waste half
your day for the likelihood of not being selected. So there’s gotta be
a better way. So why not use the best platform
on the planet for this, which is YouTube? You can use YouTube not only to
find talent for the casting directors, but to audition
as well. And that’s what we’ve
done with our hack for it this weekend. We’ve implemented five
APIs to find the talent and then to audition. And then– [LAUGHTER] MICHAEL: And this is the
demo of the app. MALE SPEAKER: Is this on? MICHAEL: Cool. MALE SPEAKER: OK, so what we’re
doing here is emulating a casting director. And I’m going to start
by searching for a certain type of talent. And we found that paries are
young, interesting people doing song rip-offs and
things like that. So I’m gonna do that search. And what this is going to do
is use the Freebase API to basically do a search
that is categorical. So it’s possible for me to
refine and narrow and to actually that I want
parodies of a composition, musical type. That can be really helpful
for a casting director. The other thing you’ll see here,
though, is that there’s subcategories of TV programs. Maybe I want to exclude things
from Mad TV or Deal or no Deal or various locations from
the search results. And as I go through this, I see
this is more user-based than video-based, like you see
in other examples tonight. We’re looking for specific
talent, like Hassan Hassar. And we’re trying to find out if
he’s actually featured in his content. So we look a little bit at his
likes and his subscribers, things like that. But we’ve got little four
thumbnails here. And sometimes I match up the
thumbnail of his account profile with the clips
that he has. And then I can find out if he’s
actually a real person of interest for me. And then I can go and
communicate with him. So the other part of that loop
has to do with going and finding a specific person
and communicating. This happens to be Keith,
my partner. I’m interested in him, so
I’m gonna contact him. That’s going to pop up a box
here that gives me some suggested text that I can use in
my communication with him. When I go and log in, I can then
paste that in there, send him that message, and he’ll
get a link to an addition. That addition is here. And what we have is some basic
information that we collect. We go onto the next page. And this addition happens
to be a recording. KRISPY: OK, that’s time. MALE SPEAKER: No. All right, so– MALE SPEAKER: Is that time? Aww. MALE SPEAKER: Maybe it’ll
run in the background. You can ask questions. We’re out of time. MALE SPEAKER: So as part of the
audition, which we didn’t have time for, is he was going
to sing “Call Me Maybe.” MALE SPEAKER: I was going
to sing “Call Me Maybe.” AUDIENCE: Do it, do it. [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: If you guys really
want me to, I’ll do it, otherwise– MALE SPEAKER: There it
is, right there. KRISPY: Just remember to talk
into the microphone. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: So
super interesting. You guys are solving
a real problem. Talent agents are all
over YouTube. They don’t necessarily know
how to filter through it. I like that you’re attacking
two sides of it, at the submission angle, which I don’t
think we got as much insight into here, but then
also the reviewing angle. So really cool. Congratulations. NANEA REEVES: Yeah, I think it’s
a great business idea. And there’s a real
need for it. The challenge that I think
you’re gonna have is that a lot of casting calls have
physical attributes. You know, male, brown
hair, et cetera. How are you gonna solve for
that in the searching? Because I didn’t even see that
addressed in your UI. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. A lot of times, the YouTube
search results from Freebase are tagged with things that
are in the video. And that’s being more and more
rich as time goes on. We didn’t have a chance to
integrate with Google+, which would have given us the
additional characteristics on people’s profiles. We’ve also found that almost
all these people who are professional or
semi-professional have Twitter profiles that expose those
characteristics as well. So the idea would be we expose
those social traits, like– NANEA REEVES: You need
something like content ID for people. MALE SPEAKER: Exactly. NANEA REEVES: Right? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah. PAUL CARFF: So just curious,
do you guys know each other from before here? MALE SPEAKER: Yeah, we do. MALE SPEAKER: We’ve
worked together before on another project. MALE SPEAKER: And Howard, who’s
over there, raise your hand, Howard. MALE SPEAKER: That’s awesome. PAUL CARFF: It’s fun to see
people come together at an event like this that don’t know
each other and look at the fun things you can do. And I think you’re a good
example of that. MALE SPEAKER: But just for
everyone’s benefit, this is all Brian’s work, too. He’s the only hacker
on our team, too. MALE SPEAKER: [INAUDIBLE] and testing apps. MALE SPEAKER: This is
a one-man job here. MALE SPEAKER: Nice work. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: OK, let’s get team
number seven, YouTube Manager for force.com. MATT KAUFMAN: Hi, I’m Matt. And my cameraman over
here is Mike. We work for MK Partners, a
Salesforce consulting firm based in north Hollywood. And Monday through Friday,
most of our time is spend implementing custom apps on
force.com, as well as integrating with other systems
and platforms, such as Google. What we built this weekend– thank you– was an integration between
Salesforce and YouTube for businesses that use Salesforce
to be able to monitor their YouTube uploads and get the
statistics on them and kind of gauge the ROI on their videos. And so I’m logging into
Salesforce right now. And Mike, while we were
talking, just took a video of me. And I’m his manager here
in Salesforce. So I’m going to the Videos tab,
and I’m going to go ahead and look at the pending
videos. Let’s see what we have here. This looks like a video
from before. Let me just click on this one. And I can approve it. And when I approve it, it’s
actually going to change it from a unlisted video
to a public one. I can also preview
this video here. Let me stop that. Coming down here, he submitted
this for approval earlier. I’ll go ahead and approve it. When he submitted it, I actually
received an email with a little link, picture,
all that kind of stuff. Come back here to the Videos tab
again, and I can show you some other videos that
we might have. We’ve been trying to upload as
many videos as possible. So I can come here and
see all the different videos that we may have. We actually have 10. We set up a schedule to run
every hour, to go and query, from the data API, the things
like view count, like count, et cetera, et cetera. Let me go ahead and
just pull one up. Let’s see if we can find
this one here. MICHAEL: Recording demo. MATT KAUFMAN: Which one,
recording demo? Phone demo? MICHAEL: No. MATT KAUFMAN: Recording
demo, sorry. Gotta talk into the mic. So I’m just gonna do a search
for that one, and I’ll find it real quick. One second. There we go. Here we go. And what I’m gonna do is, let’s
refresh the stats and see what happens. Doesn’t look like anyone’s
watched it yet. Maybe I should watch it. If we were to go and go ahead
and go to YouTube and like it, then we’d be able to record the
likes, a dislike as well, comments, and so on
and so forth. What was the one
we did earlier? Do you remember? There we go. So this one, we’ve been asking
other people to watch. And so you can see there,
there’s 13 views, one comment, and so on and so forth. And we can actually see it. Here’s the link if we want to
go to see more about him. We can actually see
that comment. There’s the comment
down there. Wonderful comment by me. Other features, reports and
dashboards are built into the force.com platform. So we can show you
that real quick. Here we go. KRISPY: OK, that’s time. MATT KAUFMAN: Perfect. [APPLAUSE] MATT KAUFMAN: Thank you. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Questions
from the judges? GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Yeah,
I have a question. What would you say is the–
can you give me the hypothetical use case? I can think of four or five. But what do you think is the
most straightforward use case. MATT KAUFMAN: Sure. So the dashboard’s off already,
but some of the dashboard ones that we had up
there was listed videos by owner, tallying up the view
count, the like count, stuff like that, so you can actually
see which of the employees in your [INAUDIBLE] are better
at making the videos. We also had it based
on category. You could have it based
on channel. Basically any of the data
that we can collect, you can then see it. So for our marketing department,
again, the whole goal was, one of our customers
that already pays for Salesforce can now manage their
marketing efforts from Salesforce, and not just take
a guess, OK, we think that people like this video. You could actually see it,
report on it, do AP testing, things like that. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: There’s a
big market, too, in real estate, and listing agents
having people make videos for them so they can sell
their properties. I can see that being a really
viable use case as well. MATT KAUFMAN: Sure. That’d be great, yeah. NANEA REEVES: Yeah,
I like the– I mean, I can use it at our own
company for some of the video workflow that we have. And would I be able to add more
metadata beyond what is coming from the YouTube API? Because sometimes I think that
way I could customize it, the aggregates to my business? MATT KAUFMAN: Yeah, you could
add to our custom fields to the object itself. Plus, you could add child
objects if you wanted to as well. NANEA REEVES: Yeah, I like it. I mean, I would buy it as
plug-in to our Salesforce. MATT KAUFMAN: Oh, you
use Salesforce. OK. NANEA REEVES: Yeah. MATT KAUFMAN: I’ll
give you a card. [LAUGHTER] KRISPY: Congratulations. You made a deal. PAUL CARFF: Yeah, I think it’s
just a good integration, too. It seemed very seamless. I was very impressed with that. Nice work. MICHAEL: Yeah, and it’s
mobile-ready too. MATT KAUFMAN: Right. Great, thank you. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: All right, the
battery’s gone. I think I switched–
oh, there we go. That works. All right, so next team, team
number eight, Dare and Do. Come on up. Your time starts now. JOEY: Hello, world. My name is Joey, and we are
Dare and Do, a crossfit experience. So just by a show of hands, how
many of you actually heard of crossfit? That’s a good number. How many of you have actually
tried crossfit? OK, it’s a little bit smaller. One of the most intimidating
things about trying something new is taking that first step. Thankfully, we live in
a YouTube world. Dare and Do allows our users to
explore, interact, and take that first step. Juan will explain what
that first step is. what our app does is that,
instead of just trying to work out on your own, because we all
know it’s really boring to walk on a treadmill for 45
minutes, what you can do is you can compete against
different people. And all these different blue
marks are people who are ready to take on certain challenges. And if we zoom in over here,
closer to Venice, these are different challenges
that we have there. And after they look at the
challenge, the people who can find the challenge most likely
are going to be the people who are going to be on
the mobile app. And on the mobile app, they
can then at that point go ahead, zoom in, and they
can take a look at the actual challenge. So for example, I’ll
demo this to you. If you want to take
a look at that. JUAN: So from there, you can
go ahead and zoom in on the actual challenge. You can see either what it is
or you can watch the video. So for example, here I made
one where I’m challenging everybody that walks over there
by the climbing wall to do 10 push-ups. So after this loads, it’ll have
the dare that I made, and then I’ll actually do it. So that’s why it’s
Dare and Do. So it’s very interactive. It’s supposed to get more of a
community involved in working out, rather than just working
out on their own. JOEY: One thing we did is we did
a little market research. We went down to Paradiso
Crossfit, and we talked to David, the owner. And I said, David, have you
ever considered putting a Google TV in your gym? And he said, no. He said, what value is that
gonna add to my customer? I said, David, have you ever
considered putting one in your Venice gym and one in your
Marina Del Ray gym? That would then allow you to
have a competition between your two gyms. So every Friday at 6 o’clock,
you could have an online competition between your
Venice gym and your Marina Del Ray gym. And he said to me, now that is
something that improves my customer experience. So with Dare and Do, what we
are doing is we are taking crossfit competition
to the next level. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Questions
from the judges? PAUL CARFF: I kind
of like this. How do I sign up to get
notified of these? What’s the interaction there? JUAN: There’s a couple
different ways. In the first version, it’ll
just be exploratory. You don’t need an account
to log in for right now. As you can see, this is a public
map, so you can view any of this that I did
on a Google Map. Anybody can do that. Eventually what I’ll do is I’ll
add in login with your Google account. That’s how I’ll do it. And then I’ll have
to set up all the rest of the user interface. But I’ll enable it to where you
can sign up for specific notifications, whether it’s by
area, whether it’s by your circles, however you want– PAUL CARFF: Yeah, I could
imagine if I happened to walk by the wall that it would know
that I just walked by the wall and that one of these
is there. And then I get an alert on my
phone to tell me, hey, you’re signed up for this, here’s
a Do or Dare, go for it. JUAN: Right, so you would
set that one and off. That way you don’t get
notifications all day. JOEY: Yeah. And you can send stuff
to circles. You could have, like, Crossfit
LA, or you could have just buddies that you want to
challenge, and therefore you can go as big or as
broad as you want. And we feel one of the
interesting things about crossfit is that, in order to
compete in the Olympics, you have to be verified. So you have to have your scores
verified and so forth. So what we were thinking of is
doing integration where people could upload their verifications
online. So if you’re not near a crossfit
gym, you could be certified to compete. We also think that we could take
this and the challenge aspect and apply it to
different verticals. So maybe something we could do
in the action sports world. And so, really, just a way for
people to consume, create, and curate content. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Nice job. There are a couple other
products out there in the market which do similar
things. ibeatyou, recordsetter.com. I think what really
differentiates what you guys are doing is the integration
with the maps. Nice job on that. Making it geo-aware is obviously
a huge opportunity. You just kind of alluded
to this. Crossfit seems like one
application, but really any competitive or comparison-based
activity, I think, if you– JUAN: When I first came
up with the idea– GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Next
group is ready. Yeah? JUAN: –I had such a bad idea
of, it was a truth or dare, you’re going to appear
to do stupid things. [INAUDIBLE]. So at first, it was supposed
to be a truth-or-dare type app, where kids were gonna do
Jackass-style type things. But thankfully, the
ladies came in and said, you know what? NANEA REEVES: The Jackass
version would be more popular, though, I’m sure. [LAUGHTER] NANEA REEVES: I think that you
might want to consider building up the platform
and having an open API. It’s a good idea. And I think it could lend itself
to a lot of innovation in the just public space. It’s kind of interesting. KRISPY: OK, that’s time. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Team number nine. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: And it’s
a Google TV application? Is that right, Krispy? KRISPY: Yes. So we’re switching gears now. We’re gonna start looking at a
bunch of applications that run on Google TV. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: So what was
your app doing? We have to look up there,
so direct [INAUDIBLE] yourself. BRETT STATUM: OK
Well, Raphael. I’m pointing to Raphael
behind you there. Hi, welcome. My name’s Brett Statum, my
teammate Raphael Velasquez. And we were team number nine. The app that we created
is called ToonTube. So we had a few goals when
we created this app. Both of us are .net heads, so
we wanted to kind of take a dive and try doing
some Android. We also love the Google TV
devices we got when we walked in, so we wanted to
write something we could run on that. And we wanted to try and exploit
some of the APIs, the search APIs, the player APIs,
that kind of stuff. So Raphael had a great idea of–
he’s got a two-year-old son, wanted to be able to create
an app that his son could play, either on a tablet
device or up on the Google TV, and basically get a reward when
he accomplished a task int he game, get to
watch a video of a character that he loves. So we basically came up with
this game, where if he’s playing on the tablet, he can
tap a character, or if he’s playing on a Google TV, he click
on the character using the TV remote. So why don’t we go ahead
and try to play there. Now, playing it the TV itself
is a little more. You can see it’s playing down
here on the tablet. We have some characters bouncing
around on the screen. Playing on the TV was a little
more difficult coordinating the mouse interactions there. But we’ve got some characters
just randomly bouncing around the screen there. And if we go ahead and
click on one of them. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -Everybody, Snuffy, Big Bird. Come see what Elmo did. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] BRETT STATUM: We get
the video to play. Now, we know kids have short
attention spans, so we didn’t want the video to play
all the way through. So we go ahead and cancel the
video after a few seconds and then return them back
to the game. Try to grab one up there. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -Ready. Everybody, Snuffy, Big Bird,
come see what Elmo did. -Oh, what have you done, Elmo? -Well, well, Elmo– [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] BRETT STATUM: Oh, there we go. So anyhow, opportunities for
this, of course right now we’re limited to the characters
we have on screen, but you could extend that to
additional characters, maybe even licensing opportunities,
tying the search APIs to pull back videos rated by popularity
relative to that character, and take
it on from there. KRISPY: Are you guys done? BRETT STATUM: Yep. KRISPY: Awesome. And now time for questions. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: All right, judges. We’ll hand it over to
you for questions. NANEA REEVES: I think
it’s a very cute UI. I’m wondering about the
viability of it as it relates to licensing, and how you
would work with the IP owners on it. BRETT STATUM: Yeah, so
definitely from a licensing perspective, that’s a big
question mark out there, of, A, who would want to do that? How could they control the
quality of the video that’s coming back through that? So that’s really digging more
into the search APIs to see how tightly we can control
the result set that comes back from that. But if nothing else, stirring it
around and using characters that were non-branded,
characters that you create yourself– the puppy, the cat,
the dog– and pulling back content-related videos, not so
much character-related videos. NANEA REEVES: How do you
restrict the content to be child-safe as well
in the return? BRETT STATUM: And that is
definitely an issue right now as well. So what we have right now is
hard-coded videos that are coming in there. And that was our biggest concern
there, was ratings are one part, but it was making sure
that, A, you were getting videos that didn’t have
advertisements in them that you were uncomfortable with your
child seeing, and then also the content there. So there were a few question
marks around that, being able to control that. Maybe some pre-curated
content through that. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: I think you
created something really cool, a simple way to discover
and consume content. I think actually programming
sets of videos would be a really simple way to go. I could Imagine our company,
for instance, we have different verticals. Kids vertical is one we haven’t
attacked, but if we had 10 videos we produced here,
it was just an easy way for your child to interact with
it, I think that’d be fantastic, and a much more
intuitive way than searching and browsing through maybe
YouTube sites. Very cool, nice job. BRETT STATUM: Thank you. PAUL CARFF: So you demonstrated
clearly here the difference between– even though
they’re both Android, it’s an Android app– is the
interface on the TV and an interface on a tablet. And we talked about it
briefly earlier. So what are your thoughts at
this point about what you would do to make the interface
and the TV work given the constraints that you have? BRETT STATUM: Well, some of the difficulties there are the– well, as a positive on the
Google TV side is the diversity of hardware
that you have. But that makes it difficult for
you as a developer to know what that remote has in terms of
an interaction paradigm for the end-user there. When we first started this–
again, we’re brand-new to Android as well. So we first had buttons. And with the remote, you could
easily just step through them. But that kind of took the
challenge out of the game. So we decided right now we’re
using images, and you have to target them with the device. So an accelerometer-based remote
would be great, where they didn’t have to use the
touch pad, or a mouse that was a little more responsive to
the taps would be nice. But that is definitely a
question mark in terms of [INAUDIBLE]. PAUL CARFF: Something that just
came to my mind is, you know, you think of a ball, kids
playing with a ball, and you could use the D-pad to drive
the ball around to get and intersect with it. BRETT STATUM: Yeah,
definitely. Good idea. KRISPY: All right,
that’s time. BRETT STATUM: All right,
thank you. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: So next up, we
have the Giggle team. Where’s Giggle? Giggle on the way. And are you guys doing it on the
Google TV, or are you just doing web browser? JEN: Hello. KRISPY: Too soon. JEN: OK, I’m gonna go ahead. My name is Jen. This is Ryan. And we represent Team Giggle. I’m a big music fan, and I hate
when I miss shows, either because I didn’t know the band
was coming, or because I didn’t know I liked that band. So we built an application that
mashes up the Songkick API, which is a data provider
around concert calendars, and the YouTube API. So it allows users to
continuously stream videos to see and hear artists who
are coming soon to a venue near them. So Ryan’s gonna demonstrate
how this works. What you do is you run the app,
and you type in where you are and what kind of
music you like. And then it will continuously
stream these videos, and you can just watch them. You can watch videos until
something catches your ear. You can skip through them if
you don’t like something. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [CHEERING] [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] JEN: If I were going to Paris, I
might type in Paris, which I think Ryan just did. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] JEN: Yeah, that doesn’t
work for me either. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -What would I– would I do? [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] JEN: That’s kind of cool. I don’t know, I might
check it out. So if I see something that I
like, I can click the Buy Tickets button. And that provides an
action for me. I can make plans
for my weekend. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] JEN: Cool. So we came together at the
beginning of the weekend. None of us had ever met. And we tried to build this
application that would create awareness around artists and
events and allow you to take action on them and get
out in the real world and do something. And I think we succeeded. Technically how it works,
it’s all JavaScript. First we’re calling the Songkick
API, and we’re finding matches for venues and
upcoming events in your town, the city that you enter. And then we’re matching that
with the YouTube API and finding popular videos for those
artists and allow users to stream them. So I think that the way that
we would extend this is to probably add a few more fields
to add a level of granularity around maybe your neighborhood,
a venue, an artist search. And there are several
ways that we think that it could be monetized. One, there’s an affiliate
program for Songkick. So if you’re selling tickets
through this app, you buy tickets, we take
a cut on that. There’s also, I think, an
awesome opportunity for musicians, labels, managers,
venues to place their content here, to sort of promote
their content through the app that way. [LAUGHTER] JEN: I would definitely
go see that. [LAUGHTER] JEN: And that’s Giggle. [APPLAUSE] GEORGE STROMPOLOS: It’s
really cool, guys. I’m a huge music fan, too. I’m always wondering what I’m
gonna go do on Saturday night. And if this helped me discover
new bands and quickly buy the tickets, I would use
the app for sure. What did you do to try to
avoid irrelevant videos showing up in the results? JEN: So we found that
there was some challenge around genre. Neither of the data services had
really awesome information about the genre for a band. It’s just hard to get. Songkick does this
professionally, and they have a really hard time with it. On the YouTube side, we had a
challenge around whether we wanted to show highest view
count, most recently published content, whether we wanted to
show content from official channels, fan-generated
content. What we decided to do was just
search for the keywords and show the first video
that showed up. We did a ton of looking
around. And the stuff from the official
channels wasn’t always the best. The most recent wasn’t
always the best. The most, most highest view
count wasn’t always the best. So we decided to go with
the YouTube default. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Did you
restrict results to music and entertainment? Or are you going for
other categories? JEN: So we started by working
with the Freebase API to zone in on the music category. We ran into a little bit of
trouble with it and backed out and decided not. But that would be a great
future enhancement. NANEA REEVES: I liked
it as well. And I was wondering, would you
consider possibly allowing people to embed it on their
blog sites, et cetera? A web version of it? JEN: Sure, why not? NANEA REEVES: Yeah. I like the fact that you
tie in the commerce to it, and it’s not– they’ve already stated an
affinity for something. It’s right there. JEN: Yeah, particularly if
we were allowing content producers to place their
content, it would still make sense for that to be embedded
somewhere else. NANEA REEVES: Yeah,
definitely. It’s a good idea. I like it. I like the simplicity of it. JEN: Thank you. KRISPY: OK, next. PAUL CARFF: OK, I want
this on my phone. I want to be able to have it
just know where I’m at and then just start telling
me, hey, there’s stuff there for me. I don’t want to have to
go look for it, just have it tell me. KRISPY: All right,
thanks, guys. JEN: Thank you. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: OK, team number
11, TVUS. TVUS coming up. MALE SPEAKER: Who’s driving? KRISPY: OK, time starts now. CHERI: Hi, I’m Cheri. And I’m going to tell you about
a new Google TV app called TVUS. It puts the social
back into TV. What we have is a program that
embeds a screen into your TV while you’re watching
anything. It can be a TV show, it can
be reading a magazine. You could be checking
out a game. It’s putting it so that you have
a live streaming image with someone, and you’re able
to talk to each other, see each other, and interact. It’s a lot of fun, and
it’s really cool. MALE SPEAKER: So we
opened the app. It’s basically, as you can see,
if you have opened the Play store, it’s basically an
app that will open up a screen to a previously loaded video. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -About a year ago,
we introduced something called Hangouts. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: Can you
lower the volume? [VIDEO PLAYBACK] -In the beginning, people
were using it to just– [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: As you can see,
there’s not much UI involved, because you want it to
get as [INAUDIBLE] as possible to [INAUDIBLE]. But– [VIDEO PLAYBACK] –take people on a photo walk
in a Hangout, and all of a sudden people were cooking,
dog-training– [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] MALE SPEAKER: There you go. And so as you see, the main
novelty and aspect of our idea is the ability to overlay
content onto any screen, whether it’s TV, app, or any
other applications, with the size and feature quality
of HD TVs. And so what we’ve done is we’ve
used the new YouTube Android player API to
embed videos into our transparent app. So you can actually overlay
on top of any app. So if I were to open Google
Chrome, and I were to then open up this app on top
of that, it would still show a video. And what we’ve also done
is we’ve used the Google Hangouts API. And using the Hangout On Air
capability, we’re allowed to show Hangouts, actually,
as if they were live-stream YouTube player. So you can actually interact
with web cam through that. And we’ve done that before,
but for the purpose of the demo, we’ve just gone
with the video. But yeah, you can show video
on top of YouTube videos as well, and the possibilities
really are endless. And so in the 30 hours we were
allotted over this hackathon, we’ve come up with
this prototype. And we feel like it’s the
foundation for a really big idea that can be augmented with
a variety of features and appealing UX design. So some of the things we have to
work on now that we felt we might not have enough time to
implement fully here is working on how are we gonna get
multiple people to be able to come together in a room to
chat about these, about the videos that they’re watching,
about the live TV, and connect people through our app to see
the same experience on top of whatever they’re viewing through
their Google TVs. And though it’s a small step,
we feel if we do embed more features, create more features
for it, that it can really– KRISPY: OK, that’s time. MALE SPEAKER: –change
how we use TVs. KRISPY: Let’s pass it
over to the judges. Judges, take it away. [APPLAUSE] GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Nice work. I just wanted to talk about
a practical application. So you may have heard
of the Streamys. It’s sort of like the Oscars
for web series and original web content. It’s happening in February,
so next month. If people have Oscar parties
at their home, they host little parties with their
friends, and they have cocktails and things, and they
watch the Oscars together. So we’ve been looking at ways
to have people watch the Streamys on a global basis and
be able to host a little party and show yourself interacting
with your fans and things like that. So we would use this. So very cool, and
nice execution. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. NANEA REEVES: It kind of reminds
me a party mode on the Xbox, which I really like, and I
guess got wiped out with the Metro update. So there definitely is an
audience who wants to trash talk during certain events. And I think it’d be interesting
to see how you could do public versions
of that as well as the private ones. I think it’s a great idea. Is it allowed on– is this a ToS violation? PAUL CARFF: I just want to say,
good persistence on your side for figuring out how to do
the overlay, because it is a challenge on how
to do that on TV. I really can’t comment on
the other side of it. You did mention being able
to do a Hangout, though. How did you do that? MALE SPEAKER: I said there’s a
Hangout On Air capability. And what it’s actually doing
is that when you broadcast your Hangout, you can just show
people a YouTube link, and they’re able to see your
Hangout from YouTube, because it shows on any YouTube player
like a live stream. Like, if you want to view
Swedish House Mafia concert on YouTube, and you could
live-stream, it’s kind of like that, but with [INAUDIBLE]. PAUL CARFF: But your current
version, you weren’t participating in the Hangout,
you were just watching the Hangout? MALE SPEAKER: No, no, we were
actually participating. PAUL CARFF: OK, and where’d
you get the camera? MALE SPEAKER: Oh, from any
other Android device. So what we were gonna talk about
also is that hopefully you can initiate a Hangout
and join from any other Android device. NANEA REEVES: That’s smart. I like that. KRISPY: OK. MALE SPEAKER: And some
TVs also have it. KRISPY: That’s time. Please bring the remote. Thank you very much. OK, so team number 12 is
actually gonna go. Let’s take Team of Five,
team number 13. MALE SPEAKER: Who’s
driving this one? KRISPY: OK, your time
starts now. GEORGE: All right. Hello, everybody. My name is George. And the people in my team
are Kenneth, Mandra, Prasana, and Sharon. And we have created
the Swanky app. So what is the Swanky app? The Swanky app is a smart remote
control that allows Google+ users with smartphones
to discover, share, and enjoy extra content right in your
phone, tailored to enhance your Google TV experience. So how many people here have
smartphones or smart tablets? Raise your hands. And how many of you guys
actually use your smartphone or smart tablet while watching
television to search for something that looks interesting
or sounds interesting? So what we have done is we’ve
created this really cool app that we thought it would be
really cool if the app would know who you are, know what kind
of things you like, and pushes all the information
straight into your phone. So let’s pull up the slides, and
I’ll show you guys here on this screen what it does. So as you can see, when you’re
watching a video, it displays the information right on your
phone, what the title of the video is, and the information of
the video, along with other information that has to do with
the video, like what kind of music it was played, what
kind of items they use on the video, and where the
video was shot. But why don’t I show
you guys slides. Let’s show you guys how
it actually works. So you’re sitting on your couch
with your phone, and you’re watching Google TV and
you start playing the video that you’re watching. So can we turn on the– OK, so you’re watching the
video, and as you’re watching, it’s pushing information. And right now, you
can’t really see. But it’s pushing information
right into your phone with the title, the information
of the video. And from your phone, you can
actually purchase the music right from your phone. You can download it
in your phone. Everything is makeable. And as you’re watching, without
interrupting everyone else who’s watching the same
video, you’re getting it pushed right to your phone. So you have the capability of
clicking and going to see what song is playing, downloading it
to your phone, if there’s any extra content, like a link
to a Amazon website where you can actually purchase, for
instance, for this video, the sunglasses, it takes you right
to the site in Amazon and you can do all your purchases within
your phone without affecting everyone else who’s
sitting on the couch watching the same thing you’re
watching. And because it’s connected with
your Google+ account, it’s tailored to what you like,
because as you like things and dislike things, it
starts to learn what kind of things you like just from your
social media presence. KRISPY: OK, that’s time. Let’s pass it onto judges. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Judges? PAUL CARFF: So I’m curious how
you do the communication. How does the application know
that I’m in the room with my phone at the time that you’re
playing the video that I’m probably gonna be interested
to send it to me? MALE SPEAKER: The way that it
works, it’s an app that’s on your Google TV and on your
phone, and it’s synced. So whenever you’re watching TV,
it recognizes what you’re watching in real time. And through an app that he
created, Kenneth created, the content providers can actually
tag their videos with advertisements within
the timelines. So as you’re watching and as it
starts to play, it starts to send you information. PAUL CARFF: So what was the
protocol that you used to sync the two devices? MALE SPEAKER: We basically
started off with UDP and integrated it on this network. But we are [INAUDIBLE]
discovery mechanism. And I think the way forward
would be the Google [? DVD mode. ?] GEORGE: We also think that this
app would be great for professors and teachers to
use, or how-to videos. As you’re watching the videos,
instead of clicking or looking through what sort of items you
need in order to perform the tutorial, it’s sent right to
your phone, so you can save it as a wish list, or you
can purchase it right from your phone. NANEA REEVES: I like all of the
thinking that you’ve done to connect the experiences, but
I think that there’s gonna be a lot of competition in this
very space, even at the platform level, like
SmartGlass. And I know a lot of people are
working on dongles that sync the two up, like the
player device. And I think the big challenge
for all of these applications are going to be user adoption. What’s the value proposition
to me to want to sync this experience up? So I like the execution. I think, though, the viability
of the concept might have some challenges. So You might want to think
about, what’s the one hook that’ll make it stand out? Because I think this is an area
of innovation to come up with these multi-screen. But we’re going to get assaulted
by e-commerce buttons everywhere. So it’s just something
to think about. Like, what’s the one
hook with that tab? KRISPY: OK, we’re
over time now. Thanks, guys. Let’s go with team number 14. Glassroom, working title, make
your way to the podium now. ALI: Is this working? Anybody taking a remote? KRISPY: All right, your
time starts now. ALI: OK. Well, hey, everyone. My name is Ali, and
I’m a teacher. I’m a high school math teacher,
to be more specific. And one big problem that me and
my colleagues face every day that we always talk about
is the fact that we have difficulty getting honest
feedback throughout the lesson as we’re teaching
our students. And that is why we’ve decided
to create Glassroom. Glassroom is a simple tool that
allows teachers to create lesson plans using the YouTube
API, and then use Google TV to get good real-time interaction
and feedback from their students as they’re
giving the lesson. So here’s a good demo. So I search for math lesson. It brings me up a
bunch of videos. I can just go through, click
whichever ones I want, now it gets added to the lesson plan. I can search for another
thing if I want– whatever, algebra– and
then add those to my lesson plan as well. Now, after this is done,
we get to starting and playing the video. Now, this is where the
feedback aspect of it actually starts. So there’s three screens
involved. This is the view that
the student gets. They can pull this up on a
smartphone, any smartphone, a tablet, or a laptop. It’s just a unique URL that they
can go there, and it’s responsive and it works
well in all of them. Then there is a second view
that the teacher has that gives them this live feedback
from the students. And a third view, which is
the Google TV itself. Now, how it works– I actually have this for
you guys here, if you want to try it out– is as I’m giving the lesson, you
can basically provide live feedback by tapping that Review
button that you see right there, and I can
see the result of it happen on my screen. So when I give the lesson– oh, you can see it up there. So, you guys, as you tap
it, it affects that. So after the video is over, I
can look and seem hey, I have 10 students, and seven of
them requested a review. Maybe I should do this
again, or maybe I’m just a bad teacher. But anyway, it’s just I need
to redo this lesson. And I can also use the
color-coded aspect of it. So I can ask them a multiple
choice question and have them all answer and to this
anonymously. So they don’t have to worry
about impending progress of the class, or being a little
bit embarrassed in front of their friends. So that is, in essence, what
Glassroom is about. It’s about bringing transparency
to the relationship between students
and their teacher and creating a positive feedback loop
that helps all of them. And in the future, we can have
a clog aspect to this, where you search through and find
other teachers’ lesson plans. You can find analytics on when
and where issues popped up for students and where they
had difficulties. And all of this is done using
simply a $99 Google TV, a monitor or a TV that anybody
could use, and the devices that the students
themselves have. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: So I work with a
school system of San Diego, and one of the things they’re
doing is starting to use a lot of the, like the Khan Academy,
for example. So this is exactly the video
content you’re looking for. I would really be interested to
see what you’d do with the analytics, in the sense of,
you’re getting all this feedback, you can identify what
the, quote, good videos are, and then provide that
feedback to the teachers, or even into your products to
say, only recommend these videos for them to
select from. Very, very interesting idea to
discover the content and figure out what’s good. ALI: We actually had the idea
of also giving that to the video providers themselves,
possibly giving it to them. And I’m sure that’s information
they’d want, if people keep getting stuck at
certain points throughout their video, because we can
even pinpoint where in the video they’re having
difficulty. MALE SPEAKER: And the fact that
the feedback is provided anonymous, it makes [INAUDIBLE]
feel comfortable so that they would provide it
without getting scared, also getting honest feedback. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: I can see,
like, a bar trivia kind of game being built on the same
platform for sure, which I would love to play sometime. Also, I was wondering if you
guys gave any thought to the distraction to students. So would it actually be
distracting from the actual lesson itself to be looking down
and pushing buttons and things like that when you’re
supposed to be focusing on the lesson? ALI: Well, in my personal
experience, they usually have their phones to be distracted
anyway, because they’re texting each other. So hopefully this will actually
be better, because their phones will be there for
something that’s actually pertaining to the class,
and they can use it for the lesson. MALE SPEAKER: And that’s why we
kept the UI very minimal. So they just press one button,
not too much interaction. NANEA REEVES: I like it. And I think you guys get an A
for great presentation and clarity, in that I think a lot
of great ideas don’t happen because they don’t know how
to present the idea. And so I think you did
a great job on that. ALI: You guys can’t
keep the phones. [LAUGHTER] KRISPY: All right,
free phones? [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: OK, team number 15. MALE SPEAKER: I have a
question for George. George, does it mean you work
in the video industry, you never use your phone while
watching videos? That’s just something you do. KRISPY: [INAUDIBLE]. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Do
it all the time. MALE SPEAKER: OK, thanks. KRISPY: Who took my remote? Ah, OK, hidden. That’s great. And so those guys. Oh, all right. NANEA REEVES: Which
one are you guys? KRISPY: My bad. OK, your time starts now. JORDAN: Hello, everyone. My name’s Jordan Samora. SEAN: I’m Sean. JORDAN: And today we’re gonna
present to you Vid Socially. So there’s a current problem
with video-watching right now. Video-watching isn’t
social at all. Video-sharing is social. You can share links
on Twitter. You can share links
on Facebook. But when you’re watching the
video, you’re really watching it by yourself. It’s not a live content. It’s content that’s
been there before. So it’s kind of like, how do you
get all those past viewers involved with watching
the video with you? What we plan to do is have a
video commenting timeline. So as a video’s playing, people
can come at specific time points, intentionally when
they wanted their comment to be displayed. The thing with videos is,
there’s only so many different emotions during videos. There’s high and low points. And this way, you can actually
comment exactly when you wanted, and that comment makes
sense to the current video playing content. See comments kind of pop up
as they come in there. SEAN: Yeah, so actually one
example is, Google actually has live commenting
for live streams. So this live stream right
now is having comments. So on the right side, people are
commenting as people are presenting this. But when you go home, you watch
this, you’re not gonna know who’s commenting about
your presentation. So with this method we have,
you’ll actually be able to scroll through and look at
where people commented at which time in the video in past
videos, so not just live videos, but also past videos. And so another thing
we have is– so popular videos have
a lot of comments. You wouldn’t want just comments popping up all the time. We want it to be non-intrusive,
which is why it slides up very small. And we wanted it to work on all
videos, so we could put any video in here. And then we can actually see
which parts of the video are more popular. So in this example,
you can see that there’s three lines here. So maybe you just want to skip
to that video to see what people are talking about,
because this is a very long video. I’m sure people have seen
this video before. So you can actually see what
are people talking about in this video. So you can see where
they developed. I think this is the most popular
part of this video, so that’s one thing that this
application brings. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] JORDAN: Questions? GEORGE STROMPOLOS: I’ve seen
some folks do this poorly, and I think you guys actually did a
really nice execution of it. Keeping the single-line
comment, I think, is really smart. You could potentially integrate
with the circles G+ API to do it within a close
group of friends. Nice job. Very cool. JORDAN: Thanks. NANEA REEVES: I saw this in
another company in Kentucky about a year ago. And they had actually layered
over the friends commenting, which I thought had
a good use case. But I haven’t seen that
deployed yet. So I think there’s
an opportunity here if you move quickly. JORDAN: Thanks. Thanks, guys. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: OK, now we have team
number 12, with a kind of unique demo, something we
haven’t seen yet tonight. So team number 12, please make
your way to the podium. And don’t forget your
remote control. MALE SPEAKER: This is the last
presentation, right? KRISPY: Yes, you guys do have
the privilege of being the last ones to go. MALE SPEAKER: Thanks
for hanging out. Maybe take a deep breath. I know we’ve had a long day,
but you guys are great– amazing products, creations. And now’s the time for us. KRISPY: So why don’t you
describe what you’re doing while we’re seeing things
going on on the screen. MALE SPEAKER: We are
cross-platform mobile app developers. We like playing with phones and
creating games and putting phones up into the market,
and just hanging out. But anyways, we’re ready? All right. By raise of hands,
who here likes to chat online with friends? OK. Now, who here would like their
own personal robot that can scope out anything, even
in the most dangerous places in the world? All right. Well, we created the app, Video
Warrior, which is for you who raised your hands. Video Warrior is the ultimate
low-cost video conferencing and surveillance system
utilizing Google technology systems, YouTube, and Hangout. And the Arduino board and our
robot friend, Harvey. Here’s how it works. Open the Android app from
your phone, and welcome to Video Warrior. All right, so look at that. Actually utilizing the camera,
your pretty face or our little frame here now is live on
Google TV as a streaming YouTube broadcast to your
selected friends. The broadcast can be recorded. Be the next Simon Cowell and
produce your own YouTube Idol sing show, where you can view
on Google TV various talents singing on Hangout and broadcast
it to the world of YouTube users. Now here’s the cool part. And you’re seeing right now
is the cambot mode, which instantly turns your robot into
your own robot who’s your second set of eyes. Use Harvey to help you babysit
while at work by placing our robot in the baby’s room,
alerting you of a cry and perhaps recording their
first word. With the power of Harvey,
Arduino, and Google, we can send Harvey to dangerous areas
like nuclear-infested areas to scope out any possible lives to
save, watched over Google TV, and control Harvey by your
Google remote anywhere with internet connection. Video Warrior will be a free
download in the Play store and other markets for Hangout users
and $49.99 with Harvey. Be a great dad, cool friend,
or awesome superhero with Video Warrior. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Judges? GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Can you
talk about some of the technology behind what
you built here? MALE SPEAKER: Sure. So basically what we’re doing
is we’re using the Android Google API with YouTube to
communicate as a Wi-Fi camera between Google TV and
the Android phone. AUDIENCE: Louder. MALE SPEAKER: Sorry. And basically the Arduino board
is connected to the Android phone, and the Android
phone communicates with the Arduino board. Unfortunately, we didn’t get as
much functionality into the Arduino board as we wanted. We’re hoping to get the remote
itself to actually control it. But that’s gonna be a future
implementation. MALE SPEAKER: If you turn your
head, we have the Hangout back there on that computer. That’s recording. MALE SPEAKER: Yeah,
unfortunately the live streaming Hangout thing didn’t
seem to be functioning. But we do have the Google
Hangouts broadcasting this from [INAUDIBLE]. NANEA REEVES: Just one
question, how do you differentiate from a lot of,
like, the X10 cameras out there, et cetera? I mean, I’d have to give
my phone to this. MALE SPEAKER: We were picturing
this to be more targeted for kids or something
like that, where they could hang off their– it doesn’t
even have to be a phone. It could be a iPod that
connects to a device. And it’s more modular, because
typical encapsulated projects like this can run around $250,
whereas we’re doing this in something of a low market– $49.99. You can interchange the base
kit, so you could get a rotocoptor. MALE SPEAKER: This is
the Arduino board we were talking about. For anything to a
computer input– KRISPY: Talk into the mic. MALE SPEAKER: This is the
Arduino we were talking about. And you could input your phone
or anything and you have an instant computer with Wi-Fi. There you go. You have a movable computer. And with the camera, you have
a movable own robot. NANEA REEVES: I just keep
imagining trying to put it on my cat. MALE SPEAKER: Don’t put
it next to water. KRISPY: OK, so that’s time. And that brings us to the
end of the demos. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: So, Jarek, I think
you have a few things you want to say. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Here’s what
we’re going to do next. We’re gonna allow our judges to
deliberate for about 15 to 30 minutes. And while we wait, we’ll play
Krispy’s long-form video from the hackathon. So he actually made two edits,
because as I said, he is a very talented video editor. KRISPY: This one’s
a bit longer. It’s about, I think,
13 minutes longer. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: If you’d like
to take a break, get a drink, snack, please
help yourself. I would like to also take this
opportunity to thank Fullscreen for producing
the live-stream show. Thank you very much,
judges for Google. [APPLAUSE] JAREK WILKIEWICZ: [INAUDIBLE] live-streaming is a
tricky business. KRISPY: So what else is still
coming up today, Jarek? JAREK WILKIEWICZ: So after
this, we’ll have awards ceremonies. KRISPY: Let’s talk about the
prizes for a second, because we’re pretty proud of
what we brought. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: So
we have drinks. KRISPY: Drinks rock. Drinks are awesome. What else have we got, Jarek? JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Let’s see. We have toys. KRISPY: What kind
of toys, Jarek? JAREK WILKIEWICZ:
We have tablets. KRISPY: Tablets are
pretty good. Nexus 7s? JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Oh,
we have Nexus 7s for the winning teams. And then the grand
prize tonight– KRISPY: Well, I think the grand
prize is for Google TV applications. Now we did kind of state
that at the beginning. So some of you might have
noticed the rather large 55-inch LG Google TV sitting
in the front. Now I should note, there’s
only one of them. So teams of five, I
don’t know, buy a chainsaw or something. You guys will have to decide
amongst yourselves who would get that. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: All right,
well, let’s watch Krispy’s videos and wait for the
judges to come back. KRISPY: So this one’s a little
longer, like I said. JAREK WILKIEWICZ: Let’s
play the long one. [VIDEO PLAYBACK] [MUSIC PLAYING] -We’re going to have
a lot of fun today. All right, we got a lot of you
don’t know what you’re getting from Google. And we’re gonna talk about
them in a second. But we’re here to help you,
answer your questions, so that this becomes a fairly enjoyable
event and you guys can walk away feeling like
you’ve accomplished something. That’s what we really
want to see. –onto player API. So you’re building a [INAUDIBLE]
app, whether it’s a mobile app or a
Google TV app. And you want to integrate video
playback capability in your application. -On average, about 300 million
people in the US watch about five hours of TV per day. Interesting? You know what that is? That’s 166,000 years
of television watched in a single day. That’s more than the entirety
of human history. -People ask me whether
this is a real photo. And the answer is, it
is a real photo of me with a fake sign. [LAUGHTER] -So how many people know what
[INAUDIBLE] does at Google? OK, all you guys in the
red shirts know. So we’re about close to 200
people in the company. We’re a pretty good-sized
team. And we’re literally around
the globe We’re on all but one continent. Nobody’s gone to Antarctica
yet, as I’m aware of. I think we’ve been there,
but nobody’s actually working there yet. And we are here to reach out
and work with you guys. You guys have questions about
the APIs, the different products, that’s what we do. We help you, and then
we listen to you. And this is the more fun for us,
is that we get to go back to the engineers that work on
these individual products and say, we missed something, or we
[INAUDIBLE] something, and we give them feedback. -We don’t want any conflict
between us and Google and their advertisement, because
our app has to do with enhancing the user interface
while you’re watching content through your Google TV. -We’re here with my friend,
making the applications. We compete. We like to compete
because it’s fun. We learn from evangelists, and
we learn from companies how to use your API in technologies we
implement, and eventually use them for applications
in the future. So we’re here today at the
Google TV YouTube competition. And we’re learning about the
Google APIs and how to build apps in a couple hours. -Sure. We’re working on an app that’ll
be based inside salesforce.com with the
force.com platform that will allow companies to upload videos
to YouTube and then automatically receive the stats
of how many people have watched that video, liked
it, et cetera. -What you fixing up
there, Jeremy? -I don’t know. -That looks like
a lot of guac. -I hate to disappoint you. I’m here supervising three
different people for other teams. -OK. And what are they building? -You know, one of them
was the cat videos that you saw up there. The other one was connecting
with the Ed tech students. We’re interested in
furthering that. And then the last one is
gonna surprise me. So we’ll see. -Cool. -I think it’s one, if we
complete this– actually, phase two is mostly done. So we’ll just go through
this one more time. You said, which video– -It’s a cool hackathon combining
YouTube and Google TV technologies. They’ve so far welcomed
everyone, talked a little bit. And folks are putting up all
their ideas, and teams are trying to form. And we’re looking forward to one
hell of an event tonight. -They’re doing the hardcore
stuff, and I’m just getting the presentation ready. So it’s coming along
swimmingly. -Hey. -We’re doing good. We’re coding. We’re at the beginning. We all understand what
we’re doing now. And our goal is clear, so I
think everyone is focused and everyone’s working on their
own piece of the puzzle. -We’re working on some
HTML/CSS-based modules that’ll be the building blocks of our
pages, while our partners are working on our database
schema. And hopefully within the hour or
so, we’re gonna be able to start merging together. -Cool. -I think we won’t have any
trouble making deadline. -Awesome. -We’ve got a bunch of it
designed and coded. And we’re just gonna smush the
two together, and everything will be magical. -Awesome. -It’s 4:10 PM, and we’re able
to record from our webcam using the upload widget, up to
YouTube, and pull some stats on that video. -Cool. -Right now, just adding on a
little page where we can expand on the search. It is good. -You were up too late
last night. -No, no. To expand on the search. There’s a tool bar for the
more popular searches. And now I’m naming categories to
put as examples of what we see. -You ready for another exciting
day of hacking? -Yes. -Good. -As ready as ever. -We’re doing pretty good. -Yeah? -We’re where we wanted to be. We had a late night, till
2:00 in the morning. But– -You look a little sleep-weary,
a little like, I don’t know where I am. -That’s usually how I am. -So where are we at? -We’re doing good. We have a application that lets
teachers use Google TV in the classroom and get feedback
from the students by having the students anonymously
engage when they don’t understand. And we have the view that lets
teachers set up the videos and prepare the class, and also
the interface that the students will see. Right now we’re planning to make
a bring-your-own-device interface, so that students with
computers, cell phones, tablets can engage with
the application. -Fighting timers. -Fighting timers? You all set for another
day of coding? -[INAUDIBLE]. -I had this awesome trick
I was gonna do to you. It’s gonna take me a little
while to build it, though. -Day number two. How are you guys doing? -Coding strong. -Coding strong? All right, so tell me
where you’re at. -Well, we’ve done the
basic functionality. And we are building the
interface to get the aggregate now. That’s where we are. -Anything you’ve
learned so far? -I’ve learned a lot with you
guys on using the new API, YouTube API. They are learning a lot about
the Google TV SDK. -Yes, I was. -And did you stay up,
or did you sleep? -I’m not sure, actually. Both. -You think you’re a hummingbird
of some sort at this point? -Yeah, that’s right. -So how far along are you? -Pretty much close. -Yeah? -Yeah. -You think you’ll be
ready for demo. -Yeah, I think so. -OK, good. What time is it? -7:15. -Were you here all night? -Yes, I was sleeping up there. -Oh, OK. And how far along are you? -I’m pretty far along. We have just a few things
left to do. -OK, we’re nearing the
end of the YouTube LA Hackathon at Google. And everyone’s been working
really, really hard, trying to get their applications
finished, get their presentations in order. A lot of them have gone
without much sleep. Some of them even spent the
entire night here, so they’re very dedicated. I’m really excited to see what
everyone’s put together. And hopefully everyone
had a great time. You guys think you’ll
make the deadline? -They will, because I
believe in the guys. Go team. [MUSIC PLAYING] -We’re going to have a lot of
fun today, because you’ve got a lot of you don’t know what
you’re getting from Google. We’re gonna talk about
them in a second. But we’re here to help you,
answer your questions so that this becomes a fairly enjoyable
event and you guys can walk away feeling that
you’ve accomplished something. That’s what we really
want to see. –onto a player API. So if you’re building a
[INAUDIBLE] app, whether it’s a mobile app or a Google TV app,
and you want to integrate video playback capability in
your application [INAUDIBLE]. -On average, about 300 million
people in the US watch about five hours of TV per day. Interesting? You know what that is? That’s 166,000 years
of television watched in a single day. That’s more than the entirety
of human history. -People are asking me whether
this is a real photo. And the answer is, it is
a real photo of me with with a fake sign. [LAUGHTER] -So how many people know what
[INAUDIBLE] does at Google? OK, all you guys in the
red shirts know. So we’re about close to 200
people in the company. We’re a pretty good-sized
team. And we’re literally
around the globe. We’re on all but
one continent. Nobody’s gone to Antarctica
yet, as I’m aware of. I think we’ve been there,
but nobody’s actually working there yet. And we are here to reach out
and work with you guys. You guys have questions about
the APIs, the different products, that’s what we do. We help you, and then
we listen to you. And this is the more fun for us,
is that we get to go back to the engineers that work on
these individual products and say we missed something,
or we [INAUDIBLE] something, and we give
the feedback. -We don’t want any conflict
between us and Google and their advertisement, because
our app has to do with enhancing the user interface
while you’re watching content through your Google TV. -Hello. We’re here with my friend,
making the applications. We compete. We like to compete
because it’s fun. We learn from evangelists, and
we learn from companies how to use your API in technologies we
implement, and eventually use them for applications
in the future. So we’re here today at the
Google YouTube competition, and we’re learning about Google
APIs and how to build apps in a couple hours. -Sure. We’re working on an app that
will be based inside salesforce.com with the
force.com platform that will allow companies to upload videos
to YouTube and then automatically receive the stats
of how many people have watched that video, liked
it, et cetera. -What you fixing up
there, Jeremy? -I don’t know. -That looks like
a lot of guac. -I hate to disappoint you. I’m here supervising
three different people for other teams. -OK, and what are
they building? -You know, one of them was the
cat videos that you saw up front there. The other one was connecting
with the Ed tech students. We’re interested in
furthering that. And then the last one is gonna
surprise me, so we’ll see. -Cool. -[INAUDIBLE]. The biggest one, I think
if we complete this– or actually phase two is mostly
done, so we’ll just go through this one more time. You said which video– -It’s a cool hackathon combining
YouTube and Google TV technologies. They’ve so far welcomed
everyone, talked a little bit. And folks are putting up all
their ideas, and teams are trying to form. And we’re looking forward to one
hell of an event tonight. -They’re doing the hardcore
stuff, and I’m just getting the presentation ready. So it’s coming along
swimmingly. -Hey. -We’re doing good. We’re coding. We’re at the beginning. We all understand what
we’re doing now. And our goal is clear, so I
think everyone is focused and everyone’s working on their
own piece of the puzzle. -We’re working on some
HTML/CSS-based modules that’ll be the building blocks of our
pages, while our partners are working on our database
schema. And hopefully within the hour or
so, we’re gonna be able to start merging together. -Cool. -And I think we won’t have any
trouble making deadline. -Awesome. -We’ve got a bunch of it
designed and coded. And we’re just gonna smush the
two together, and everything will be magical. -Awesome. -It’s 4:10 PM. And we’re able to record from
our web cam using the upload widget, to YouTube, and pull
some stats on that video. -Cool. -Right now, just adding on a
little page where we can expand on the search. -It’s too early, or something. -It is. -You were up too late
last night. -No, no. To expand on the search. There’s a tool bar for the
more popular searches. And now I’m naming categories to
put as examples of what we see. -You ready for another exciting
day of hacking? -Yes. -Good. -As ready as ever. -We’re doing pretty good. -Yeah? -We’re where we wanted to be. We had a late night, till
2:00 in the morning. But– -You look a little sleep-weary,
a little like, I don’t know where I am. -That’s usually how I am. -So where are we at? -We’re doing good. We have a application that lets
teachers use Google TV in the classroom and get feedback
from the students by having the students anonymously
engage when they don’t understand. And we have the view that lets
teachers set up the videos and prepare the class, and also
the interface that the students will see. Right now we’re planning to make
a bring-your-own-device interface, so that students with
computers, cell phones, tablets can engage with
the applications. -Fighting timers. -Fighting timers? You all set for another
day of coding? -[INAUDIBLE]. -I had this awesome trick
I was gonna do to you. It’s gonna take me a little
while to build it, though. -Day number two. How are you guys doing? -Coding strong. -Coding strong? All right, so tell me
where you’re at. -Well, we’ve done the
basic functionality. And now we are building
the interface to get the aggregate now. That’s where we are. -Anything you’ve
learned so far? -I learned a lot with you
guys on using the new API, YouTube API. They are learning a lot about
the Google TV SDK. -Yes, I was. -And did you stay up
or did you sleep? -I’m not sure, actually. Both. -You think you’re a hummingbird
of some sort at this point? -Yeah, that’s right. -So how far along are you? -Pretty much close, yeah. -Yeah? -Yeah. -You think you’ll be
ready for demo? -Yeah, I think so. -OK, good. What time is it? -7:15. -And we’re you here all night? -Yes. I was sleeping up there. -Oh, OK. And how far along are you? -I’m pretty far along. We have just a few things
left to do. -OK, we’re nearing the
end of the YouTube LA Hackathon at Google. And everyone’s been working
really, really hard trying to get their applications
finished, get their presentations in order. A lot of them have gone
without much sleep. Some of them even spent
the entire night here. So they’re very dedicated. I’m really excited to see what
everyone’s put together. And hopefully everyone
had a great time. You guys think you’ll
make the deadline? -They will, because I
believe in the guys. Go team. [MUSIC PLAYING] -We’re going to have
a lot of fun today. You got a lot of you don’t
know what you’re getting from Google. We’re gonna talk about
them in a second. But we’re here to help you,
answer your questions so that this becomes a fairly enjoyable
event and you guys can walk away feeling that
you’ve accomplished something. That’s what we really
want to see. –onto a player API. So if you’re building a
[INAUDIBLE] app, whether it’s a mobile app or a Google TV app,
and you want to integrate video playback capability in
your application, [INAUDIBLE]. -On average, about 300 million
people in the US watch about five hours of TV per day. Interesting? You know what that is? That’s 166,000 years
of television watched in a single day. That’s more than the entirety
of human history. -People ask me whether
this is a real photo. And the answer is, it
is a real photo of me with a fake sign. [LAUGHTER] -So how many people know
what [INAUDIBLE] does at Google? OK, all you guys in the
red shirts know. So we’re about close to 200
people in the company. We’re a pretty good-sized
team. And we’re literally
around the globe. We’re on all but
one continent. Nobody’s gone to Antarctica
yet, as I’m aware of. I think we’ve been there,
but nobody’s actually working there yet. And we are here to reach out
and work with you guys. You guys have questions about
the APIs, the different products, that’s what we do. We help you, and then when
we listen to you. And this is the more fun for us,
is that we get to go back to the engineers that work on
these individual products and say, we missed something, or
we haven’t [INAUDIBLE] something, and we give
them feedback. -We don’t want any conflict
between us and Google and their advertisement, because
our app has to do with enhancing the user interface
while you’re watching content through your Google TV. -Hello. We’re here with my friend,
making the application. We compete. We like to compete
because it’s fun. We learn from evangelists, and
we learn from companies how to use your API in technologies we
implement, and eventually use them for applications
in the future. So we’re here today at the
Google YouTube competition. And we’re learning about the
Google APIs and how to build apps in a couple hours. -Sure. We’re working on an app that’ll
be based inside salesforce.com with the
force.com platform that will allow companies to upload videos
to YouTube and then automatically receive the stats
of how many people have watched that video, liked
it, et cetera. [END VIDEO PLAYBACK] KRISPY: Check, check. OK. All right, guys. If you want to make your way
back into the main room, we have some winners. You don’t want to miss this. You’ve all worked
very, very hard. So do make your way
back in here. Oh, everyone’s gone silent. Don’t be shy. Come right on in. Grab a seat. Let’s fill this room. There we go. OK, so I’m going to hand these
mics over to you guys. Please introduce yourselves. Tell us a little about
your companies. And I’ll give it to you. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Great. Thank you, Krispy. KRISPY: You’re welcome. GEORGE STROMPOLOS: Hey, guys. Congrats on getting this far. I’m sure it was a lot of fun,
a lot of hard work. My name’s George Strompolos,
by the way. I’m the CEO and founder
of Fullscreen. I actually used to work
at YouTube myself. I was at the company for about
five and a half years. I was trying to solve a lot of
the same problems that folks were beginning to
look at today. I left YouTube two years ago and
started Fullscreen to help support creators and help brands
build audience, make money, and have fun
being YouTubers. We’ve grown pretty massively. We have about 10,000 creators
in our network. We do two billion
monthly views. We have 140 people here in
Culver City, about 26 developers and product people. Actually, I think Matt
Danna, one of our product guys, is here. What’s up, Matt? So wanted to let people know
that we’re actively hiring. Saw a lot of smart stuff here. If you’re interested in
a job in the YouTube space, hit me up. So thanks again. NANEA REEVES: Great. [APPLAUSE] NANEA REEVES: I’m
Nanea Reeves. I’m the CEO at Machinima. And Machinima, my goal with the
engineering team there is to make it one of the best
places in Los Angeles to work for engineers, so you don’t
have to move up north where it’s cold. [APPLAUSE] NANEA REEVES: I’ve a vested
interested in doing it. So we definitely have
open job recs for our talented engineers. I saw a lot of great
talent here. If you’re interested, we’re
working on some pretty cool stuff there. Send your resume to
[email protected], or you can talk to Kim Pope right
over here, and she will hook you up. We would love to have you come
in, especially people who know the YouTube API and have also
worked with Google TV API as we look at extending
the new platforms. But really, I just want to
say congratulations. I saw a lot of great talent
here, very innovative. And we’d love to support
you, so please send us your resumes. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Thank you
guys very much. Appreciate you being here and
participating in this. All right, I’m gonna hand it
over to Paul at this point. Paul is one of my colleagues. He’s a developer advocate on
Google TV, and one of the special judges for this
evening’s event. So, Paul, take it away. PAUL CARFF: So thank
you, Krispy. Thank you to everyone who’s
been here this weekend. It’s been a lot of fun. I like to do these events to see
the energy and such that comes up with all of you here,
working all those hours. I was here till 5:00 this
morning myself. And I know there was least three
to four of you that were actually awake all night long. And it was very good to see
that, so thank you to all. Let’s give everybody a
round of applause for all their hard work. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: So it’s time
for the awards. I want to first say thank you
to everyone for listening, because I thought the show
went very smooth tonight. It’s one of the best that I’ve
seen as far as a hackathon. There wasn’t very much in the
way of disruption once we got over the first big one. And the presentations, the
judges were very impressed with the presentations. You guys did very, very well
preparing and doing them. And some of you are going
to be noted for that. So thank you very
much for that. Also, there were so many good
apps that we decided to add an extra one that we hadn’t
planned to do. The first one is going to
be an honorable mention. We’re putting it in for the
execution in a short time. “Is short time?” Oh, I love typos. OK. [LAUGHTER] PAUL CARFF: We were hurrying. So this team, we were
impressed with it. They weren’t the top team,
but they were very good. And we wanted to recognize them
for the work that they did– again, given
the short time. And so in order to award them,
our judges here, their companies have offered to buy
a $50 gift card for each of the team members. And that team is Vid Social. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: So you guys come
up on stage here. So I think what everybody wants
to know is, what are you gonna do with all that money? [LAUGHTER] MALE SPEAKER: So it’s
a Google Play app. I don’t know, I’ll probably buy
some apps off the Google Play store. MALE SPEAKER: Buy some music
with it, or some games, yeah. KRISPY: Very good. MALE SPEAKER: Thanks, guys. KRISPY: Thanks, guys. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: All right, the
next up is wow factor. This is one that, when we
listened to the presentations and thought about what it was,
what it could be used for, and just kind of knocked our socks
off, as you heard me say during the weekend. We were really happy with
this, excited for where it could go. And I think the judges alluded
to this when they were up there talking about it. And that team is TVUS. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Come on up, guys. So, Paul, what do they win? PAUL CARFF: Will all the team,
yeah, please come on up here. I think there was four
or five of you. Four of you? Each of these team members
coming up now will each win a Nexus 7 tablet. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: So if you can just stand
there and hold them up, and face me. Yay. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Thanks, guys. Good job. All right, Paul, who
we got next? PAUL CARFF: OK, as I talked
about at the weekend, how quickly you can get something
done, how far you can complete during the weekend, and the
viability of your concept, the one that everybody was
real happy with there was Team Giggle. KRISPY: Yay. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Come on up here, guys. PAUL CARFF: [INAUDIBLE]. KRISPY: All right, Nexus 7s
for these guys as well. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Nice, keeping it real. Has everybody got one? There we go. OK, hold them up high. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Thanks, guys. Oh, the suspense is building. The suspense is building. PAUL CARFF: OK, viability’s
important to these guys, so we want to recognize this next
team for that as well. I noted that during the weekend,
I thought they had the best teamwork of
the teams, as I watched over the weekend. And we all agree that they did
the best integrated team presentation. And that team is Glassrooms. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: There you go. MALE SPEAKER: Thanks
very much. KRISPY: Which apps are you
guys gonna install first? MALE SPEAKER: Google Maps. KRISPY: Google Maps? I think it’s already
on there actually. So other than Google Maps,
what might you install? MALE SPEAKER: This is
a great question. KRISPY: All right, hold
them up high. Let me get a shot. Great. Thanks, guys. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: All right, we really
liked this next team because of what we thought was
the best use of the technology that we showcased during
the weekend. This team, they’re all gonna
get Nexus 7 tablets. We don’t have them all here,
but you all will get one. And that team is Team of Five. KRISPY: Yay. [APPLAUSE] PAUL CARFF: So please don’t
leave after the show. Make sure you tell us name,
address, phone number so we can ship these to you. KRISPY: They will arrive
in the mail. Great. Thanks, guys. MALE SPEAKER: Thank you. KRISPY: Good job. Very tough. OK, so now, if we do simple
math, that was four teams? That was four. OK, so I think there’s one prize
we have left to give away, isn’t there? PAUL CARFF: There is. KRISPY: And it’s kind of big. You might have noticed
it when you came in. Maybe it’s on the stage now. Who might we be giving
this to, Paul? PAUL CARFF: OK, so this is going
to be one of the teams that has already won, because
this is the overall prize for the overall best app. And the team captain gets to
have a fun time figuring out who’s gonna get this
on the team. it’s team TVUS. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: Come on up, guys. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: OK, now lift
it over your head. I’m kidding. Nice, good job. [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: He’s not wasting
any time. Woo! [APPLAUSE] KRISPY: All right. Let’s just give everyone a nice
round of applause again. I think we’ve had an
amazing weekend. We’ve had some incredible
apps built. All of you put in a lot of time
to this, and I’ve been very proud to participate
in this. You guys have been awesome. And thank you to the
judges again. And that sort of concludes our
little hackathon here. Hopefully you’ll join us
for future events. This was worthwhile. Tell your friends, tell your
family, tell other developers. Build, build, build. Thanks, guys. [APPLAUSE]

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