Elevator Pitch Examples (Airbnb, WeWork, Slack)


I love the concept of an ‘Elevator Pitch.’ It’s a fantastic mental exercise for you as
a founder and one that is very commonly overlooked So what is an elevator pitch? It’s a short description of an idea, product,
or company. It’s meant to be shorter than an elevator
ride, meaning, 30 seconds or less. The concept also applies to pitching yourself,
as an individual, to introduce yourself and or land a job- but we’ll be focusing on the
company/startup version of this. An elevator pitch should be enough to
explain your startup idea and leave the investor curious for more. Now, this is not to be confused with the concept
of a pitch deck. What is a pitch deck? A 10-15 slide presentation to introduce a
business proposal- mostly associated these days with an investor pitch deck. If you are looking for that, we have a couple
of videos focusing on pitch decks, as well as a neat pitch deck template, which you will
find in the description. Back to the elevator version: in this video,
we are going to look into some tactics to approach writing your elevator pitch, lessons
learned. Then I’ll take a stab at writing some elevator
pitch examples from companies you are probably familiar with. This is, Elevator Pitch Examples for Startups Let me give you my Elevator Pitch first, and
then we’ll break it down. Do you ever need to make slide presentations? (I’ll assume you said yes). How long does it usually take you? (Insert any answer here, it’s probably going
to be hours). We discovered that the reason why it takes
so long is that all presentation platforms give you a white canvas: you need to figure
out the content of the deck while figuring out how it’s going to look. All at the same time. It’s just very inefficient- and if you’re
not a designer, your slides might not look too good. So we created Slidebean, a tool where all
you need to do is add the content, and the design of the slides gets generated automatically. Over 10 million slides have been created with
our platform. So here’s a quick teardown. Starting with a question. We have the advantage of tacking a problem
that most people in an office have experienced. We can ‘bet’ that the answer to the first question will be ‘yes’. And that the answer to the second question will be a lot of time. The question also allows you to turn this
into a [controlled] conversation rather than just a one-way pitch. The focus here is to be relatable- to speak
to a problem that the potential customer or potential investor will probably have experienced. Not all companies can get away with this-
but try to find something that applies to your business. Slidebean is visual. It’s a lot easier for me just to show you
how it works, but I can’t do that in the elevator. Notice how I mostly focused on this problem/solution
combination. This is what an elevator pitch is mainly made
up of- it’s a teaser of the company, enough to get people interested. Notice how I didn’t use any fancy terms
like Artificial Intelligence, online collaboration, viewer tracking. Too many tech terms put together sound like
jargon. You might or might not want to share details
about customers and revenue, but showcasing A metric that gives a sense of the scale of
the business is pretty useful for your credibility. Now- moving into elevator pitch examples. If you run a Google search for this term,
you’ll hopefully come across this video. But beyond that, there are a bunch of articles
from different sources, showing some examples. None of them stood up- so I figured we could
imagine how the Elevator Pitches of some popular startups would have looked. Let’s do Airbnb. Again, assuming that this is being pitched
in 2009- with the information available on their original pitch deck, which we will link
below. We connect travelers and real estate owners
to… Wait. Wait. Remember- casual, no jargon. Conversation-like. Here we go again. Most tourists booking online care about price-
and hotels are one of the highest costs for when traveling. On the other hand, platforms like Couchsurfing
have proven that over half a million people are willing to lend their couches or spare
bedrooms. We have created a platform that connects travelers
with locals, letting them rent our rooms or even entire places. Travelers save money, and locals can monetize
their empty rooms- we just take a 10% commission. How does that sound? A few pointers here. Notice how I started mentioning tourists,
not just any traveler. Airbnb doesn’t necessarily target business. It’s easy to agree that people looking to
travel care about price, so there’s no market research or validation needed to come up with
that statement, On the other hand, it might be arguable that
people will be willing to rent out their homes to strangers. I used the Couchsurfing validation to avoid
that statement being questioned. Now let’s do WeWork. Once again, this is based on the company stage
they had by the time they made this pitch deck. Here we go, There are 40MM independent workers in the
US: consultants, freelancers, and small business owners. Solving office space is tough and expensive,
especially in cities like New York. We created the concept of space as a service. We have 20 locations in the city- where people
can rent a desk or an office without any of the complications of a traditional lease,
effectively saving at least 25% of the cost. They get access to a shared front desk, mailroom,
and a community of like-minded people. Finally, taking a stab at Slack. There is no publicly available pitch deck
for Slack, but let’s assume the company is just starting up. The average office worker receives 304 emails
per week. They also attend an average of 62 monthly
meetings, half of which they consider ‘wasted time’. Slack was made to make work more efficient. It organizes conversations by channels and
drastically reduces the need for emails or meetings. It’s integrated with 100s of productivity
tools like Google Docs, Calendars, Email, Dropbox, Zoom… so you can receive automatic
notifications and take action without leaving the interface. I wrote these for the script but if you have better suggestions, go ahead and leave them in the comments. OK, now two new features and changes for today’s
video. First, I am totally out of T-Shirts. I’ve used up every single shirt in my closet,
and I can’t keep up with our videos anymore. I’m wearing Aviato today, and I figured I’d
ask you guys for startup swag. If you ship me your startup tee- I’ll wear
it one of my next videos and then you’ll get your brand out there. How does that sound? Second, we are
going to start answering your questions at the end
of each video. Feel free to drop them in the comments and we’ll pick 3 and answer them every week. Here we go.

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26 thoughts on “Elevator Pitch Examples (Airbnb, WeWork, Slack)

  1. Love your work guys. Can't wait to see this one 🙂 watched pretty much 10 15 videos in last 2- 3 days. You are inspiring us 😊🧡. Thnank you

  2. Hey brother,we love your videos a lot, can you please make a video on "Is outsourcing manufacturing good or bad for a startup"

  3. Hey, what's the best type of company for a foreigner to register in the US? Awesome channel exactly what Im looking for!

  4. Hey, how can a small social media startup compete with large and upscale social media companies like Facebook and Instagram.

  5. What size do you wear and where should I send it? I wish i was able to come see you Wed in NYC. I got stuck in a meeting😣

  6. Hey slidebean!! When founding a tech startup with a team that has no computer science background, how would you recommend coding the project to get the desired product?

  7. What if you are looking to start a service company which is looking to use data grabbed from a certain point. The service itself is not available in the market space but there are numerous companies working in the points I was hoping to grab data from.
    I'm paranoid that if I bring in my product in the market, the other companies will just incorporate my product into their revenue model and their model will work better from onset as they are already in possession of the data I was hoping to grab.

  8. I remember one time you mentioned that we can schedule a call with you (can't remember the video you mentioned that in, I am about to activate a starter account on Slidebean, and I would love to have that 30 minutes meeting with you. Are you still doing that? yes please?

  9. Ha! I totally never expected to have that question “broadcasted”, but I’m glad it was recognized as relevant enough to answer – for me, and others likely with the same question. Thanks for the insight!.. and yes, I am looking to relationships already built through the years, for my first raise. Wish I could raise $200K! (Not even needed) Not a tech startup, but I’m REALLY sure 30% M-O-M is doable.

    Just finished my rough draft on slidebean.com. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience… and platform. You’ve got a fan in me.

  10. Firstly thanks for the content helpful as usual ❤️
    Caya i have a question
    My startup in early education is it okay to write blogs to promote for other products that helps parents or preschool owners
    “Affiliate marketing”
    As another source of income?
    Or that approach is totally wrong it could effect our identity
    Thanks,

  11. I’m not kidding, my closet is 10 of the exact same shirts, and like 5 gray sweatpants, so it seems that I ALWAYS wear the same exact clothes. It’s just one less thing to consider unless I’m doing something where presentation matters. I’m always wearing the same exact gray shirt and gray sweatpants or another set of identical short sleeved black shirts I got a few years ago. I have a lot of clothes, I just don’t care much for fashion. Life of a mathematician/coder I guess lol. I felt for you when you said you ran out of shirts 😂😂. Excellent video though! I’m working on a new approach to self driving and if I get to the point where I incorporate, you’ll get a shirt lol. Best wishes Caya!

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