A Fitbit for your Skateboard? 9 More New Skateboard Technologies


In the last version of this video, I showed
off 9 new skateboard technologies that were on the horizon. Since then, I got tips from you guys and I
found a few more myself. So here are 9 more emerging skateboard technologies,
including a Fitbit for your skateboard? All of these items are linked to in the description
with timecodes so you can skip around if you’d like. Let’s get started. First is another carbon fiber deck company
called Kape, out of Austria. Now, their site isn’t in English, but it
looks like they’re making their boards out of 4 plies of carbon fiber at stress points,
then they finish it off with Canadian maple, and a first in decks like this that I’ve
seen: bamboo. The decks are 80 Euros shipped in Austria. Probably a lot more if you want to get one
in the States. Kape has told me that they’re working on
an English site, so it might get a little easier for Americans to buy one in the future,
but for now, there’s always Chrome auto translate. Speaking of decks, Plan B has some new, old
technology called Blk ICE. It’s the latest attempt at making slick
decks for better slides. When I was a kid, these were a thing, but
they never got popular because the coating would just rub off. The idea behind slick decks makes a lot of
sense though. Make the deck itself slippery so that you’re
less reliant on how waxy the ledge is. You don’t have to be as worried about dry
spots or the deck biting in right as you land. So Plan B has been testing these for a couple
of years, and they’re finally available now. And one of those testers is Torey Pudwill,
who does nothing but the most insane slide tricks, so that adds a little credibility
to it. I haven’t found any mention of what the
slick layer is actually made of, but they also claim that it makes the deck stronger
and hold its pop longer. They go for $65. Have any of you tried these yet? Next is Servant Footwear’s Dagon shoe. It has a vegan microfiber upper with their
4Skin technology… which is an interesting name. This is really cool. They’re known for being very durable and comfortable
– supposedly 4 times stronger than suede. Richie Jackson is on their team, so you know
they’re pretty legit. I’m not a huge fan of the cross iconography
myself, but the technology is really cool. And let’s talk about Oust bearings. I considered mentioning them in the last video,
but these products are around 10 years old by now. A few people mentioned them, and to be fair,
it’s still cutting edge because nobody has really caught up yet. The interesting thing about Oust is that they
don’t use ABEC ratings. In the last version of this video, I showed
off 9 new skateboard technologies that were on the horizon. Since then, I got tips from
you guys and I found a few more myself. So here are 9 more emerging skateboard technologies,
including a Fitbit for your skateboard? All of these items are linked to in the description
with timecodes so you can skip around if you’d like. Let’s get started. First is another carbon fiber deck company
called Kape, out of Austria. Now, their site isn’t in English, but it looks like they’re
making their boards out of 4 plies of carbon fiber at stress points, then they finish it
off with Canadian maple, and a first in decks like this that I’ve seen: bamboo. The decks
are 80 Euros shipped in Austria. Probably a lot more if you want to get one in the States.
Kape has told me that they’re working on an English site, so it might get a little
easier for Americans to buy one in the future, but for now, there’s always Chrome auto
translate. Speaking of decks, Plan B has some new, old
technology called Blk ICE. It’s the latest attempt at making slick decks for better slides.
When I was a kid, these were a thing, but they never got popular because the coating
would just rub off. The idea behind slick decks makes a lot of sense though. Make the
deck itself slippery so that you’re less reliant on how waxy the ledge is. You don’t
have to be as worried about dry spots or the deck biting in right as you land. So Plan
B has been testing these for a couple of years, and they’re finally available now. And one
of those testers is Torey Pudwill, who does nothing but the most insane slide tricks,
so that adds a little credibility to it. I haven’t found any mention of what the slick
layer is actually made of, but they also claim that it makes the deck stronger and hold its
pop longer. They go for $65. Have any of you tried these yet? Next is Servant Footwear’s Dagon shoe. It
has a vegan microfiber upper with their 4Skin technology… which is an interesting name.
This is really cool. They’re known for being very durable and comfortable – supposedly
4 times stronger than suede. Richie Jackson is on their team, so you know they’re pretty
legit. I’m not a huge fan of the cross iconography myself, but the technology is really cool. And let’s talk about Oust bearings. I considered
mentioning them in the last video, but these products are around 10 years old by now. A
few people mentioned them, and to be fair, it’s still cutting edge because nobody has
really caught up yet. The interesting thing about Oust is that they
don’t use ABEC ratings. Their bearings are rated moc (“M O C”) 5, moc 7 and moc 9.
If you think about the ABEC system, it’s really irrelevant for skateboarding. It basically
only measures how perfectly round the ball bearings are. Imperfections in the shape can
cause problems in high end machinery spinning at 30,000 RPM, but think about street skating.
What’s the fastest you’ll ever go? 20 miles per hour? 25 down a huge hill? 30,000 RPM
with a 54mm wheel is 380 miles per hour, or about half the speed of sound. So Oust isn’t as concerned with the roundness,
and more concerned with the unique needs of skateboarding, like impact. Think back to
the bearing in the machinery. It sits stationary all day. But your skateboard bearings face
shearing force from powerslides, bluntslides and crooked grinds, and things like that.
You can check out their site for more details on how they overcome those things with shields
and cages and all that technical stuff. There is another bearing out there too, called
Shiver. These have gotten semi-popular because they’re sold with Shark Wheels, and they
claim that they’ll spin freely for 2 minutes straight. They’re very cheap, but their
claim to fame is that they use NASA lubricant. Just like Oust, they agree that the ABEC rating
isn’t important, but they claim it’s all about the lubricant. So I looked into it. The lubricant company
is called Pro One. I wasn’t able to find any evidence of them working with NASA, but
even if they do, what does NASA use it for? A robot driving around on Mars, or the hinges
on the door to their bathroom? I don’t know. But here’s what they claim: their lubricant
“reduces heat and friction and has over 50 times the film strength of conventional
lubricants”. That’s actually kind of cool. Now if this lubricant company partnered with
Oust, I think we’d have something awesome. By the way, Shark Wheels, they’re coming
out with a street wheel in February. I haven’t seen any pictures of them yet, I don’t know
what they’ll look like or how they’ll perform, but we’ll see how that turns out. Next is Obliged non-abrasive griptape. This
is a very small company, who sells only through their Etsy store Their site and Instagram are very light on
information, but I might be able to explain how this works. You remember the classic Tech
Deck fingerboards? They had skateboard style abrasive griptape. But any kind of higher
end fingerboard would come with stuff like this. It’s soft foam, and it works because
you sink into it slightly, and fighting the decompression as you slide provides the grip. Obliged seems to be a scaled up version of
this for skateboards, which they sell for $22 a sheet. Sounds like a lot, but it is
easier on your shoes, which could save you money. There aren’t a lot of reviews and information
out there right now, but I think the idea could work really well. Now a dirty secret
I’ve heard about the fingerboard grip is that a lot of it is just a certain kind of
gasket from Home Depot that someone cut up and started re-selling. This skateboard stuff
is a lot thicker, so maybe it’s custom manufactured, or maybe it’s just re-purposed materials from
something else. I don’t know, but I’d be interested in trying it. That is, of course, assuming they overcame
the other issue with the fingerboard version, which is that it chips off pretty easily. Someone mentioned SkaterTrainers 2.0. When
I first started skating, I learned my first handful of tricks completely stationary. I
had my back wheels on the sidewalk, and my front wheels in the grass. It’s a good way
to get over balance issues and be able to focus on trick mechanics. There have been
several attempts at monetizing this, like Softrucks, which you mount in your board in
place of trucks that look and feel like a regular board that just can’t roll or turn.
But the newest take on this is SkaterTrainers. They clip right over your wheels to make them
square and unable to roll. You may have seen the commercials for these on YouTube before. In theory, they’re better than Softrucks because
it’s on a completely normal skateboard, so the feel is the same, and it’s better than
just being in the grass because you’re on completely level ground instead of having
your front truck sunk into the dirt. Is it worth it for $25? Maybe if you’re struggling.
You need to get off of the stationary crutch as soon as you can. Think about a 360 flip.
If you learn it stationary, you’ve mastered the technique for doing something in between
a regular tre flip and a fakie one. I think after you’ve got ollies, shove its and kickflips,
it’s time to just start doing everything rolling. But if you’ve got SkaterTrainers, it might
be too tempting to not move on. So they might give you a nice headstart, but then hold you
back in the long run. Another person suggested Trick Trucks by Paul
Felty. I looked them up, and all you can see online is this video by the guy showing them
off. The idea is that the truck has no axle nut, and you can pull a little lever to pop
off the wheels quickly. Now, I don’t know anybody that frequently swaps out wheels,
but I’ve had plenty of trucks where the axle got stripped and it’s really hard to get the
nut back on. It would be nice to eliminate this problem, but the blurry 8-year-old video
doesn’t really show much detail in how they work. Hopefully, these days with Kickstarter
and IndieGogo, these could make a reappearance and potentially hit the market, or maybe inspire
someone else to do something similar. As I researched these trucks, I happened to
run into this patent application. This is another quick-release wheel setup, but look
at that wheel! I really want to try that. I think they could
open up some interesting options for freestyle tricks. This patent was published in 2014,
and I’d be shocked if it ever came out, but you never really know. OK, so the last thing is the Rideblock. It
clips on to your board and it tracks all the tricks you do, which allows you to play SKATE
with a friend from anywhere in the world. It’s pretty small, and I can’t see it
getting in the way unless you do really tweaked out rock and rolls. Here’s what the app looks like. So, you
just did a heelflip, and you pull up the screen. It will tell you the height, air time, speed
and pop force in Newtons. This is pretty cool. Maybe you can monitor your pop force versus
your height and figure out if you’re catching too early. I guess if you start training for
the Olympics, having this kind of data could be helpful. The app will assign a score to your trick,
and you can share it on social media. There also seems to be a scoreboard for spots. So
if you have the highest score at the skatepark, everyone will know it. Assuming they have
the app of course. There are a few issues with this I could imagine.
First, how does it track rotations? If you do a backside flip, does it think it’s a
varial flip? Even if you catch it pretty early and finish off the rotation? How sophisticated
is the motion recognition? It it messes up a single rotation trick, suddenly the stance
of all the other tricks in the line is wrong. In the same vein, I could do a no comply bigspin
flip, which is a really easy trick, and get credit for a laserflip. And what tricks does
it even know? Can it track late flips? What about grinds? Bonelesses? Abimanyu Nair, one
of the cofounders, claims it’s 90% accurate. I don’t know if that’s enough. You know what’s 100% accurate? Shooting
video. Just drop a tripod down at the spot and you won’t have any errors. But one cool
feature is video syncing. You can shoot video of the trick, then overlay your RideBlock
stats on it. So I guess the idea of the device is that
you and your friends can compete to see who can do a trick best. So instead of playing
SKATE, you’d just try to do the best kickflip. The app would give you some numbers to help
decide, but it can’t track style. Maybe this guy did the trick a quarter inch higher,
but this guy caught it a lot better. It has some other cool social aspects though.
You can log what your board is and people can follow you. Presumably seeing live stats
when you’re skating. It would be cool to watch Joey Brezinski and see how many attempts
it took to land that nose manual nollie flip. But of course, it’s just text on a screen,
not actually video. What do you think about the RideBlock? Or
anything else featured in this video? Did I miss anything? Let me know in the comments. Thanks for checking out my video. If you liked
what you saw, subscribe for more fresh skateboarding content every Tuesday. Here are a couple more
videos you might like.

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78 thoughts on “A Fitbit for your Skateboard? 9 More New Skateboard Technologies

  1. the fingerboard grip style is used on pro snow skates so it probably would work pretty good on a normal board. But, like you said it would more than likely chip much easier. The grip on my snowskate is curled off in some parts but, ive had friends use boots on the board which could also be the cause of the chipping and curling.

  2. I wonder if the ride block registers a trick if you just huck the board down some stairs.

    "Hey guys I triple kickflipped the 9 stair. Check the ride block if you don't believe me!" Lol

  3. Oust4lyfe! lol
    I've never used a better bearing, or seen one more suited for skateboarding! All this stuff is so cool and exciting. Great, great video, as usual.

  4. Nice video! For the stripped/smashed axles, many skate tools have a re-threader piece built in (the Reflex tool is the best). Also, what program did you use to do the intro animation? It looks great!

  5. i love how relaxed you talk and not all like "fuck" and "nigga" like everyone else-.- haha its cool you can just be super chill

  6. To clear things up a little: While the ABEC scale is pretty irrelevant when it comes to skating, it doesn't just messure the roundness of the bearing balls but rather acts as an industry standard for any given bearings tolerance.

  7. Quality content as always. How much of a script do you write and how much of it is off the cuff? Does it vary from video to video?

  8. I don't know about that app. I don't wanna know how fast and high and how many tries. Just film and check out what looks best imo.

  9. Sheering force from crooked grinds…that now explains why my one of my last set busted while doing crooks (a set of RUSH, iirc, but that was after a long time of skating them).

  10. If everyone bought blank decks, skateboarding would not die. However, professional skateboarding would since pros would not make a salary and professional companies would go bankrupt. Either way, people would still be skateboarding, which is good.

  11. I wear Servant Dragon shoes and they are extremely comfortable and the color ways are pretty cool. The only other vegan shoes which come close are the Emerica ones.

  12. I'm excited, RideBlock actually just hit me up to test out their product so I'm going to get to see what it can actually do. I will let you know after I use it for a little how useful it is and see if the issues you mentioned are a problem or not

  13. I bet someday we will have data loggers with accelerometers, gyroscopes etc on boards that will tell you what tricks you've landed, speed, rotations, manual durations etc.

  14. my first board was world industry devel guy on bottom with the slick coating, it was a layer of some kind of plastic nearly as thick as a ply. it worked great, and kept the graphics on a long time one of the only boards i never snaped too, tricks are different when your are rolling square wheels are for sissies thats so lame never seen that

  15. how about tensor trucks, anybody ever had those? with a plastic little grind plate for nose/tail slides, they were black the plastic plate was orange… it just broke off instantly for me. those were rodney mullen design truk i think. and i used to break king pins all the time on my independants i switched to ventures and it never happened

  16. I would definitely use rideblock as I'm still in the process of refining the basic 6 tricks so I think that would help me (especially since I'm having huge trouble with popping the kickflip). They launched an indiegogo campaign. I think it might not be best for every possible trick, but nailing down the basics should be helpful and it's worth it just for that.

  17. ride block is cool but I don't like anything on my board like stickers or stuff under it. it's all mental really. I've tried to put stickers on my board and if I know their there then I can't skate normal. nothing can by on my board except for the parts

  18. i dont think skater trainers are that usefull because you should try to learn tricks rolling as early as possible i myself only learned ollies stationary

  19. i dont think skater trainers are that usefull because you should try to learn tricks rolling as early as possible i myself only learned ollies stationary

  20. I thought abec had more to do with tolerances between the race and the ball bearings, not just the roundess of the ball bearings.

  21. Your videos are so awesome it's great to see someone discuss skateboarding, you don't see it often. It's also nice to see skateboarding innovations given publicity and credit rather than potentially great ideas and products not being recognised

  22. With the Ride Block, if no one was around you could just spin it however, jump and do some bullshit, just use your hands like a giant handboard and get credit for all these amazing tricks, or does it somehow know? Also if it has any sorta GPS technology itd make it awful easy for cops to locate you out street skating

  23. I can go up to 35 mph on a hill. I have loose trucks and soft bushings. I used a speedometer app on my phone to tell me how fast i was. I've compared the app to my cars speedometer and it's really accurate.

  24. Just on 'slicks', at least the old version: my friend had the Jeremy Wray model 'It' slick deck ('It' as in Pennywise). The problem with slicks back then, at least as far as we were concerned, was that they were significantly heavier. So, great for boardslides, etc, but a real disadvantage for anything else. I remember I wanted that model so badly, and to see my friend by the 'slick' version of it was really disappointing to me (obviously, you can't be seen riding the same model as another member of your skate crew, right?). I never bought a slick. They were super heavy, back in the day. From memory, the J.W. model was 8-ply +slick coating. A really heavy deck.

  25. Dude, I don't understand how the RideBlock works, but my first question would be: how does it know where the pressure for any given trick came from? So, how could it differentiate between a pressure flip, and a really low-pop flip of the same order. How could it differentiate between a late flip and a similar trick that used the same rotation and flips? My instinct tells me that it cannot. It couldn't know if I popped a massive ollie and then used my front foot to perform a kick flip, or if I used my back foot to lateflip the board into a kickflip rotation. I don't know anything about it, but without video footage, it would be impossible to distinguish, if the data solely relies on board rotation and the kenetic force data it acquires. (I'm probably wrong about all of this, but Rad Rat did ask for comments and opinions, so hey… shoot me).

  26. I ised to ride powell mini logos witj sst (super slick technology.) They would slide so fast on board, nose and tail slides. It took some getting used to or you would slip out because they were quick.

  27. The Ride Block will be useless, it's just another product riding the wave of useless and needless bluetooth devices that pair with an app. For everyone one useful bluetooth/app device, there's 1,000 ridiculous ones. There's no objective number that will ever tell you how good you're skateboarding, the one thing this might be useful for is fine tuning your foot positioning for maximum pop or highest ollie, but even then who knows if the data is accurate since I'm sure it's all accelerometer based and I doubt you can consistently identify height to the inch with that method, especially with a board that's rotating and pivoting.

  28. I imagined the video ending with a mic drop after, “You know what’s 100% accurate? Filming video.”.

  29. When you said half the speed of sound I imagined some dude on a salt flat with a street board doing mach 1 and loled

  30. I've always owned guatambu (argentine/brazilean tree) wood boards, it's so heavy that I truly feel extremely weird whenever I grab a maple one (and get A LOT of extra pop when I do)

  31. Powell slicks weren't coated they had a plastic layer that was thick and heavy. They fazed out because of the weight. I skated a powell slick for a year on the worst ledges possible. Wheel bite wasn't bad on them either but the extra weight would wear you out half way through a session.

  32. I used to know people that had bigger, softer wheels they would use to cruise to a skate spot then put on smaller harder wheels when they got to the spot. Only takes a minute to switch wheels though anyway. Don't need weird trucks for it.

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